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| | |-+  Do dcc systems have automatic anti-derail turnouts/switches available?
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Author Topic: Do dcc systems have automatic anti-derail turnouts/switches available?  (Read 5183 times)
GG1onFordsDTandI
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« on: February 24, 2013, 03:40:23 PM »

Do the dcc systems have a automatic anti derail system for turnouts/switches like the old lionel o guage stuff. It would automatically switches to aline the track with dirrection of the loco if traveling thru a turnout track in reverse, avoiding derailment. Great for the slow moving, forgetful, and younger crowd.
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2013, 04:00:24 PM »

GG
I do not believe they do. I was considering designing one of my own with photocell detectors as shown in the link.(link courtesy of richg)

http://www.mrollins.com/photodet.html

Jerry
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2013, 04:35:04 PM »

Thanks for the idea. I know I could build a setup, and emitters and detectors are great option. But alas I'm kinda lazy sometimes Roll Eyes. Guess I'm kinda looking for excuses to go dcc "eventually", and ready made circuits save time.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2013, 05:16:13 PM »

GG1-

There are many valid reasons to be lazy in this hobby, including hiring the parts we don't enjoy so much so we can focus our time on what we like best. That does, however, cost money, sometimes lots of it.

I've had progressively worse medical/mobility problems since I was in the Navy 35 years ago. At present, I can stand or walk for only a minute or so until I begin to experience severe pain and lose consciousness due to screwed up blood flow. This obviously interferes with building my new layout. So ... I'm having the benchwork, track and wiring done by a custom firm and I'll do the scenery and structures myself. This eliminates most of the crawling around under the layout, handling heavy pieces and working standing up while leaving the rest of the work, which I can mainly do seated, for me. This will also get me running trains much faster and let me spend my time on the parts of the hobby I most prefer.

Go ahead and contract out whatever you want. It'll still be your layout.

                                                                                                             -- D
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2013, 06:52:17 PM »

Doneldon, first of all thank you for your past service, second sorry to hear your not feeling up to par.(if its any consolation, "misery loves company style", Im nursing a torn diaphram, sliding stomach, and other complications, including empty wallet syndrom)(getting old sucks eh) I am a loopy loco-runner first and formost, sounds and chatter are not too important to me. Multiple locos on the lines and "fancy operating options" without the extra wiring would be my only reason for leaving conventional power. My toy-ish avatar picture is a "kit bashed" reality, proof positive I "lay my own track and claim it as my own" (a cheap lionel dc only Rock Island dock switcher, converted to AC, corgi plow, reverse travel(note the lego flag direction), added coupler and red lens on boiler end, brass cab headlight, harlaquin paint,..... never mind ill post pic' s. (Cheesy web camera)  
If that aint silly enough, wait till im done with my Bugs Bunny & Marvin the Martian "Rabbit in a broken duplicating machine" cars

"we are the boys of chorus we hope you like the show WE KNOW YOUR ROOTIN FOR US but now its time to go!"
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 07:07:16 PM by GG1onFordsDTandI » Logged
utdave

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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2013, 12:10:08 AM »

i should say  thanks to  Richg  then Jerry  for that circuit    ive been wanting to do a siding  once a train is in nothing else will go in unless that one leaves in my passanger terminal.     that 555 circuit has so many things it can do . 

Donald   you might want to find somebody close to you that likes the same hobby and help out here and there building it with you  a trainee.        when i retire which is getting closer  im going to do a layout thats not on the floor   sometimes sitting on the floor starts hurting.   i have a neighbor that helps me run mine and helps with other things when needed.   he likes to barrow alot of tools of mine and drive my old john deere tractor.   

Dave
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bapguy

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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2013, 11:05:40 AM »

You need a switch machine like the Tortouise and a DCC stationary decoder  like the Wabbit. The Wabbit instuctions have a way to do this. My friend has an N scale layout with a cross over on it. He uses Tortouise switch machines and Wabbit contollers on his DCC system. There might be other systems out there. Joe 
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richg
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2013, 11:16:15 AM »

Below is a link with many options. To my knowledge, many have been used and some he sells the PC board and some parts for. I bought and built the DCC amp meter and it works very well.

Store the link in Favorites.

http://home.cogeco.ca/~rpaisley4/CircuitIndex.html

Rich
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2013, 07:15:52 PM »

All this electronic stuff reminds me of a detection method using light reflection. I only mention it because I have yet to see it in a RR forum. This is a infrared detection method common with vending & games when it is not practical for Emitter(light source) and detector to be mounted facing each other. Also could allow smaller diameter holes for detectors(LED shaped exist) than what Ive noticed at shows(flat style). Infared will allow a totally dark room also. It normally uses a coin for a reflector, but light colored glossy stickers work well as reflective surface also. Direct overhead lighting can cause occasional false triggering of IR detectors. Cheaper florecent bulbs can cause these false triggers, incandescents are best, they will false trigger too, but mostly just before the bulb burns out. Accecptable false/failed triggers ratio was about 1:800 or better. Falling coins travel quite fast, so a few cars/loco at track speed could practically eliminate failures leaving only false light triggers to deal with. Dialing down detector sensitivity while overhead lights are on was always a prudent move. Strong narrow focused led's work best. Parallel aim is more important than "front to rear". Front to rear will be affected by spacing of E's & D's, and height to reflectors. Hope this of some use to you, as another of sooooo many electronic options out there.
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2013, 07:23:24 PM »

In the link I provided if you look up top he lists different projects and infrared detection is one.

Jerry
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2013, 08:13:27 PM »

Thank you all for the sites & input Grin. I have visited these sites in the past and these guys put me to shame in electronics knowledge, but I do have enough working knowledge to often do not need this guidance, but I do like to double check with other folks circuits due to no electronics schooling. I learned thru meter reading and trial/error using the "electricity flows like water. Both go to the ground by easiest path" approach. Diodes are check valves, capacitors "tanks", resistance a pinched hose, etc.. High school electric 101(Put food in my belly for about 6 years till I quit for more $). The real point of my reply, to your replies, was only to pass on the "reflecting trick"  Cool
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