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Author Topic: Use of Toggle switches on EZ TRack  (Read 6636 times)
jrd65

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« on: March 22, 2013, 10:11:02 AM »

I would like to use toggle switches on #5 turnouts instead of the manufacturer product included with the turnout. I prefer to use some type of momentary toggle switch instead of a Center closed switch. Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I can accomplish my objective Huh?

Thanks
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Desertdweller

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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2013, 10:53:57 AM »

You could use two momentary-contact toggle switches, each one wired to activate the solenoid in one direction only.

Les
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jward


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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2013, 11:01:48 AM »

most twin coil type switch motors come with a 3 wire connection to the motor. usually. the center wire is the motor common, you'd connect this directly to the power supply, or daisy chain it to the commons of other switch motors and connect them to the power supply.

the two outer wires are hooked up one to each of the twin coils. these you'd connect to whatever type of switch you use to control the motor.

in the case of a toggle, you'd want to use a spdt with momentary contacts, but it must be a center off type. once again, the center contact on this switch is either daisy chained to other switches or. connected directly to the power supply. the outer two contacts are wired to the switch motor using the two remaining wires from the motor itself. if the switch throws the opposite way from how you'd like it to, reverse these two wires.

the link below shows the type of toggle switch you need.
http://www.miniatronics.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=M&Product_Code=36-220-02&Category_Code=3_6&Product_Count=2

note that those daisy chained connections I mentioned  act as the common lines to the power supply, and take the place of the two conductor cable supplied with the ez track switch itself.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 11:08:50 AM by jward » Logged

Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jdw3rd


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« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2013, 01:37:55 PM »

There are momentary switch controls made for this purpose (ATLAS #56 Switch Controls for example) and they are what you want.  They are the momentary "doorbell" style of switch control.

jward:  The EZ Track switches I have for my HO are a three conductor connection: throw left | common | throw right
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 01:45:27 PM by jdw3rd » Logged
Doneldon

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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2013, 03:23:04 PM »

jrd-

Be careful when you purchase switches for your remote turnouts. A regular toggle switch or a normal doorbell button will fry your switch machine the first time you use it. That's because most switches continue to carry current after they have been thrown. Think about the toggle switches that turn lights off and on in your home.

What you need is a switch which stops current flow immediately after you throw it. This will permit the very short burst of power needed to operate the small electromagnets which operate the switch machine without continuing the flow and burning out the electromagnets almost instantly. There are sprung center off toggles which will work as long as you remember to only flick the toggle, not push it and hold it for a while.

Do note that some switch machines operate differently than the electromagnet machines which are supplied with turnouts. The best known of these is the Tortoise. These require continuous current flow because they actively hold the switch points against the stock rails instead of counting on a spring or some kind of physical resistance to hold the point in position.

Check the Shack and other electronic supply houses for the switches you need. Circuitron and Miniatronics carry what you need but they can be pricey. Also check Talking Electronics on line. They are an Australian company which sells all kinds of goodies for model railroading at excellent prices and with insanely fast delivery. The site also has tons of valuable information about model railroad electrical matters.

                                                                                                                                                                                           -- D
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jdw3rd


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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2013, 04:18:54 PM »

My layout is 100% Bachmann HO Scale EZ Track with Bachmann #5 Remote Turnouts throughout ( 7 of them: 4 left hand and 3 right hand ).  I replaced the Bachmann Switch Controls with the #56 switch controls as the ones from Bachmann are too large for my liking.  The #56 switch control is made for this specific application and WILL work fine.

It is true that if you "fall asleep" on the #56 and keep it depressed it will continue to send current to the solenoid - I suppose that over a L-O-N-G period of time this could damage the solenoid but - I know from my own layout that this is NOT a concern under normal operation.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2013, 10:46:58 PM »

It is true that if you "fall asleep" on the #56 and keep it depressed it will continue to send current to the solenoid - I suppose that over a L-O-N-G period of time this could damage the solenoid but - I know from my own layout that this is NOT a concern under normal operation.

jdw-

Not so L-O-N-G. A few seconds will burn out the solenoid.

                                                                             -- D
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jward


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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2013, 09:37:59 AM »

don,

a clarification on the tortoise motors:

while the most common way of powering them is to keep them under power at all times, there is enough torque in the motor gearing that you can (and I have) use them with momentary power.

for those not familiar with the tortoise, as opposed to the twin coils, here is the difference.

the twin coils motors consist of two coils with a metal slug that moves freely inside them. energize one coil and the magnetic field pulls the slug into that coil. however, the coils are in effect a short circuit, and since they heat up quickly they are only given a quick shot of power as with a pushbutton.

the tortoise and other similar motors are actually motors with gears inside, which are designed to be run until they meet physical resistance and stall out. under power, it is next to impossible to move the switchpoints by hand. the motor is that strong.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
mrrailroad

garden trains!


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« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2013, 11:31:47 AM »

Please dont critisize me but what is a toggle switch
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Doneldon

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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2013, 05:22:59 PM »

Please dont critisize me but what is a toggle switch

mrr-

A toggle switch is a switch which has an operating handle which is flicks back and forth in a straight line. This is as opposed to a rotary switch which moves in a circular fashion, a rocker switch which goes up and down like a teeter totter, a knife switch which moves its knife-shaped piece in or out of a set of contacts which "pinch" it, a push-button switch or a sliding switch which travels back and forth in a fixed plane and direction. Toggles come in many, many shapes. The most common is a light switch on the wall but there are also miniature baseball-bat-shaped toggles; long flattened paddle-shaped toggles; very small versions of those shapes; and others. The handles can be metal, plastic or wood. That said, there are many different functions possible with these switches, including simple on-off, momentary contact, SPST, SPDT, DPST, DPDT, contact selecting, etc. I don't know for sure since I have never actually checked it out in detail, but I think one can find versions of all of these types of switches for most or all of the various operations.

So ... your question was a good one, and not a simple one.

                                                                                             -- D
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Doneldon

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« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2013, 05:25:01 PM »

don,

a clarification on the tortoise motors:

while the most common way of powering them is to keep them under power at all times, there is enough torque in the motor gearing that you can (and I have) use them with momentary power.

for those not familiar with the tortoise, as opposed to the twin coils, here is the difference.

the twin coils motors consist of two coils with a metal slug that moves freely inside them. energize one coil and the magnetic field pulls the slug into that coil. however, the coils are in effect a short circuit, and since they heat up quickly they are only given a quick shot of power as with a pushbutton.

the tortoise and other similar motors are actually motors with gears inside, which are designed to be run until they meet physical resistance and stall out. under power, it is next to impossible to move the switchpoints by hand. the motor is that strong.

Jeff-

Thanks but I was aware of using Tortoise switch machines without constant electrification. I was just trying to keep things simple.

                                                                                                                                                     -- Doneldon
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