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Author Topic: Weathering  (Read 2518 times)
Summertrainz


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« on: August 23, 2007, 08:27:35 PM »

well i have my layout all set up...
trees... houses... grass... spectrum trains thundering down the line..
now i need to make more realism
boxcars... Look too new
any advice on how to weather them?
sand them down slightly?
throw dirt powdered dirt on them?
my basic ideas
how do you do it with out buying boxcars with that something like that already done?
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2007, 09:11:03 PM »

www.modeltrainsweathered.com

« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 09:20:28 PM by Paul M. » Logged

Guilford Guy


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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2007, 09:16:38 PM »

http://www.modeltrainsweathered.com/ ;-)
I think you forgot an "S" Paul Wink
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Alex

Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2007, 09:18:03 PM »

I use a special weathering powder from Micro Mark that you apply with a brush. Here's a sample of a car I weathered using their system:

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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2007, 09:18:46 PM »

http://www.modeltrainsweathered.com/ ;-)
I think you forgot an "S" Paul Wink

Thanks, Alex. Cheesy
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Atlantic Central

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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2007, 07:24:34 AM »

A couple thoughts on weathering:

Don't over do it, the smaller your scale the more subtle it should be.

Vary it from car to car, some should look nearly new, some should look more worn.

Know about the period you model - in the 1890's, 1920's and 1950's, the railroads where doing very well and building lots of new equipment. So the general appearance of everything would be less weathered.

Locomotives, cabooses and passenger cars are generally kept cleaner and better maintained than freight cars in all periods of history.

Sheldon
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bwreno

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« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2007, 07:20:32 PM »

Hi,  Go to www.aimprodx.com for a couple short paragraphs on weathering.

bob
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thirdrail

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« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2007, 07:31:12 PM »

Lot of good information here:

http://therailwire.net/smf/index.php?board=13.0
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