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Author Topic: EZ Track Curve Radius  (Read 15714 times)
phxpsd

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« on: May 13, 2013, 03:50:45 PM »

Where can I find the actual radius/diameter of the various EZ Track curve pieces?
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rogertra


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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2013, 04:07:19 PM »

Where can I find the actual radius/diameter of the various EZ Track curve pieces?

Bachmann website under EZ Track.  Smiley

Click on the "Online Store" link above and do a little searching, you'll find it under "EZ Track".
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 04:09:41 PM by rogertra » Logged

phxpsd

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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2013, 05:08:56 PM »

Regarding actual radius of EZ Track, on my layout the 22" curves work out to approx. 23-1/8, the 28" at 29-5/8 and the 33-1/4" at 33-7/8.  These measurements are on taken on half circles (180 deg.), maybe if they were full circles they would measure closer to the radius stated on the bottom of the track.  My reason for concern is that if I designed a complex layout to fit given overall dimensions it probably would have problems.
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2013, 05:55:16 PM »

You are measuring at the centerline, right?

Sid
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rogertra


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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 07:12:33 PM »

Radius is ALWAYS measured on centre lines, for everything.  It's a given.
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Balrog21

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« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2013, 07:16:55 PM »

download the Anyrail software and your layout will become a breeze! Even the trial version should get you where you need to go!
Bal
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Doneldon

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« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2013, 07:17:25 PM »

phx-

I hope you don't need the exact radius because you plan to run your trains right along the edge of your layout.
That long fall to the basement floor has ended the career of many model locomotives. Also, remember that you
need clearance space along both sides of your tracks. The amount needed increases on curves, moreso
with tight curves than broad ones.
                                                        -- D
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phxpsd

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« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2013, 08:40:16 PM »

Yes, measured to the centerline and no suicide tracks at edges.
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2013, 10:55:26 PM »

If you lay out a 180 degree curve with sections of 22 inch radius track, and then you measure the centerline at 23 and 1/8, then you're doing something wrong. Same as for your other radii.

Try laying out a curve and make sure your rails are butted together squarely. There is no way that there is the track is responsible for this error. You simply are either measuring incorrectly, or connecting the track wrong, or all your pieces are not the same radii.

Sid
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WoundedBear
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« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2013, 10:56:40 PM »

Radius is ALWAYS measured on centre lines, for everything.  It's a given.

For you and me maybe.......... Roll Eyes

Sid
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Ken G Price


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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2013, 11:00:45 PM »

phx-

I hope you don't need the exact radius because you plan to run your trains right along the edge of your layout.
That long fall to the basement floor has ended the career of many model locomotives. Also, remember that you
need clearance space along both sides of your tracks. The amount needed increases on curves, more so
with tight curves than broad ones.                                                      --

I still do not understand why any one does not have a fascia that extends at least 1" above the layout, so as to prevent any engine or wagon from falling off the layout. Also, what is a basement? Never had one! Grin
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Ken G Price N-Scale out west. 1995-1996 or so! UP, SP, MoPac.
Pictures Of My Layout, http://s567.photobucket.com/albums/ss115/kengprice/
rogertra


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« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2013, 11:38:35 PM »


I still do not understand why any one does not have a fascia that extends at least 1" above the layout, so as to prevent any engine or wagon from falling off the layout. Also, what is a basement? Never had one! Grin

Because it gets in the way of the view and besides, I have at least three inches of scenery (or I will) between track and fascia.  :-)

Basement?  It's that hole in the ground where you build your model railroad.  To keep it warm and dry, people tend to build some form of habitation over the top.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2013, 01:01:03 AM »

phx-

There is definitely something wrong with your measurements.

A 22-inch curve should have a radius from the center of the "circle" to the exact middle of the track of 22 inches, and 44 inches from the exact center of the track on one side to a point 180o away, again to the exact center of the track. Your measurements make me wonder if you are measuring from the center to the outermost edge of Bachmann's EZ Track. I don't have a piece conveniently at hand but in my mind's eye I can see the overall width of a piece of EZ Track at about 2.25 inches, which would explain why you are getting 231/8 inches from the center to the distant edge of the track.

Please measure again and tell us what you find.
                                                                          -- D
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2013, 12:21:15 PM »

Dear All,

Measuring the radius accurately takes a little bit of thinking and planning.

First measure the track bed width.  I got 1.915"  +/- 0.005" (A little bit off of my previous post estimates of 2".)

Lay all curves on top of each other to check that they are identical in size and shape.

Construct a complete circle.  (Not a half circle, which flexes too much to measure accurately.)

Measure the full diameter at the North and South track joints, from roadbed outside to roadbed outside.  (Widest possible measurement.)

Try not to disturb the track circle in any way.

Rotate your ruler (yardstick or tape measure) 90 degrees and measure the full diameter at the East and West track joints.  

Average the two measurements.  (NS + EW)/2 = Avg.  

Subtract the track bed width:  Avg. - tbw  = Diameter

Diameter/2 = Radius.  

So to put it all together,  {[(NS + EW)/2] - tbw}/2 = Radius

This should get you closer to the nominal radius.  

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
Doneldon

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« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2013, 01:13:01 PM »

Joe-

You can just take the printed radius and add half of the total roadbed width (1.9"/2=.95"). Or, for a rough approximation, add one inch to the printed radius for the outside radius and subtract one inch from the printed radius to get the inside radius. Diameters are all twice the calculated inside, centerline and outside radii.
                                                                                                               -- D
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