ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 22, 2021, 11:39:36 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  Amperes rating for the 46605A power pack?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Amperes rating for the 46605A power pack?  (Read 5460 times)
drabina

View Profile
« on: June 10, 2013, 02:07:45 PM »

Does anybody know what's the amperes rating in the 46605A power pack for the accessory 16V AC output?

Thanks.
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 04:30:30 PM »

From a simple search.

http://www.bachmanntrains.com/home-usa/board/index.php?topic=17239.0

Rich
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2013, 04:32:58 PM »

Look at the wall wart that comes with the set. The VA rating is right on it.

Rich
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2013, 04:49:39 PM »

I recall, about 16VA rating. These little wall warts are about that limit. Don't try a wall wart with higher rating.

Rich
Logged
Joe Satnik


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2013, 05:20:46 PM »

Dear drabina,

The two AC terminals on the top side of the controller are protected by an internal PTC thermistor that limits the output to less than the wall-wart's 1 amp rating.

I have not tested that output, though at least one person posted that theirs was very low. 

I don't know if that low amperage was normal, or if it was from a defective thermistor.

The PTC may be (designed) low to protect dual-coil turnout solenoids when the operator holds the solenoid controller button down for too long.

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik

   

Logged

If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
drabina

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2013, 06:37:00 PM »

Thanks for all the replies. I saw the quoted post but it mostly covers different part # than what I am interested in.

Even if it is half of the 1000mA on the output, I should be good as I want to power about 15x20mA LEDs from the 16V AC output.
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2013, 07:10:35 PM »

Thanks for all the replies. I saw the quoted post but it mostly covers different part # than what I am interested in.

Even if it is half of the 1000mA on the output, I should be good as I want to power about 15x20mA LEDs from the 16V AC output.

I assume you will use them in series and each series  set in parallel with each other. Don't forget the series resistor for each series set.
No idea if you have done this before is why I am adding the comments.
Assume 2 to 3 volts per LED. Each series set will draw a max of 20 ma depending on what value resistor you use.
Some people do use one resistor for each LED, depending on how they use the LED's.

Rich
Logged
drabina

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2013, 10:23:33 PM »

It is all going to be connected in parallel. Connecting LEDs in series is usually not recommended.
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2013, 10:52:12 PM »

Good idea. Some think they save on buying resistors and want to put LED's in series. I have seen a few lively discussions on this issue.

Rich
Logged
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2013, 06:24:45 AM »

I have found a hybrid combination works well for my layout.

I run a bus feed as it appears you are contemplating.  Off the bus feed I run three LEDs in series, using a 560 ohm resistor for each series of three.  This is after some experimentation.  I believe one could get away with a 330 ohm resistor, but I play it safe with a higher ohm resistor.  I have had no problems with this set up.

Granted, the correct way would be to have a higher resistor for each LED, being set up in parallel.  In the end, one has to go with what one feels comfortable with.

It doesn't hurt to experiment a little bit.  LEDs are cheap.  I have blown a few finding a combination that works for me.  There's my two cents.

Regards,

Jonathan
Logged
drabina

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2013, 08:10:53 AM »

Thanks again for all the replies.

My layout is going to be very small so I am looking at about 5 street lights and maybe additional 5-7 LEDs for the buildings. I have plenty resistors in my parts bin so I can go parallel with all LEDs.

As for the power source, I still haven't decided if I want to drop the voltage down and convert to DC (hiding the electronic components in one of the buildings) or get cheap AA battery holder and powering the LEDs from rechargeable AAs.
Logged
richg
Guest
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2013, 02:13:06 PM »

I have put three, 3mm yellow glow LED's in a BLI F7 in series. One for the headlight, and one for each number board. Used a 1k resistor and no intensity issues with a Tsunami decoder. I have never tried them for house or street lighting.

Rich
Logged
Doneldon

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2013, 03:03:40 AM »

As for the power source, I still haven't decided if I want to drop the voltage down and convert to DC (hiding the electronic components in one of the buildings) or get cheap AA battery holder and powering the LEDs from rechargeable AAs.

drabina-

Remember that rechargable batteries don't put out 1.5 volts like regular batteries do. They supply about 1.2 volts.
Depending on the nature of your lights (incandescent or LED, for example) you may be able to use that difference to your
advantage.
                     -- D
Logged
drabina

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2013, 08:09:08 AM »

Remember that rechargable batteries don't put out 1.5 volts like regular batteries do. They supply about 1.2 volts.
Depending on the nature of your lights (incandescent or LED, for example) you may be able to use that difference to your
advantage.
                     -- D


I know. Actually with one LED drawing 20mA, I may go with two alkaline AAs as they will power 10 LEDs for hours.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!