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Author Topic: IHC Covered Hoppers  (Read 31876 times)
jbrock27

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« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2013, 08:00:11 AM »

The two tricks here are: 1) putting a substance in the car that is liquid enough to flow in, but will then 2) harden
I like the idea of coming from the underside, but to figure out how to seal the hole back up.  ??

On occasion, I have weighted small, plastic fishing lures by drilling a small hole in the bottom, but in the shape of "crater".  This way, I can put some 2 part epoxy over the hole and it won't all just fall in, bc it can stick to the sides of the "crater".  I then cover it with a piece of scotch tape to get it to dry somewhat smooth, until it is dried. 
Now, for the stuff on the inside of the car.  I would imagine working on the car, it would be upside down.  Would putting white glue that a friend of mine loves to use for everything, into the hole, then adding something like small bird-shot or BBs, swishing the car around so the beads and glue mix together and then letting it dry, albeit upside down work?  Or would a problem be created if the weight was adhered to the top of the tank instead of the bottom?  If that were the case, you could probably temporarily seal the hole in the bottom with electrical tape, scotch tape or packing tape, turn the car right side up to dry and then see if you needed to do anything more with sealing the hole in the bottom.

Doc, regarding Ebay.  I agree that yes, some, no alot, of cars can be junk.  But you can also find some plums if willing to search.  And I always consider shipping fees in the total price.  If too high, I walk away-there is always more.  The way I look at it, you either spend for postage or gas those are the 2 choices.  Add to that any entry fee paid to get into a show.  I read all this stuff about people scoring at Garage and Estate sales-in my experience it is rare to find train items.

PS-I sent you a PM at the end of July, did you see it?

-jb
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Woody Elmore

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« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2013, 08:47:52 AM »

Sometimes it is possible to add solder to the frames. Just look to see if the main frame member (down the middle of the car) is solid or has an open space. You use a silicone type adhesive and just add solder. There are different solders out there with all sorts of dimensions and weights. I used to use very thin solder made for electrical work. This is a good way to get rid of old, lead-based solder.

I also have seen tank and flat car truck axles wrapped in solder. That helps keep the car on the track but I can't say much as to how it looks!

There is also the old trick of pouring soupy plaster into the tank car via the dome. That is followed by BBs. You shake the car around (like a martini) to distribute the plaster and BBs. I tried it and it worked until the car was derailed and the plaster broke - then I had a tank car that rattled!
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jbrock27

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« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2013, 09:08:57 AM »

Thanks Woody
I have more luck finding those kinds of spaces in the frame on 4 bay open hopper cars than on tankers.  Most of the tankers I have or have seen, are flat in the under frame and don't unfortunately, have that space you are referring to.  I like to use nails and epoxy, but perhaps lead core solder is heavier than a finishing nail  ??
Good ideas.
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2013, 11:05:42 AM »

jbrock - You da' Man...let's hope the spell checker becomes more popular.

Regarding weighing a completed tank car body: I think the best solution would be some sort of liquid that eventually hardens and can take the handling (mis-handling?) of normal model railroad operations. Epoxy comes to mind. There are many epoxies on the market that have longer curing times. One could inject the epoxy into the car via a rather small hole in one end (on the bottom surface); another hole (would be much smaller) would be required as a 'vent'.

The tricky part would be getting the weight just right (or within NMRA standards for that length car). I have no idea how much cured epoxy weighs. Assuming the epoxy 'filler' wasn't heavy enough, one could add BBs or shotgun pellets (which come in various sizes/weights and are available at many gun shops) before 'plugging' both injection and vent holes. By quickly turning the car over (AFTER sealing the aforementioned holes) the epoxy would 'settle' to the bottom of the tank and thereby keep the center of gravity lower (the BBs, shot would already be on the bottom surface anyway).

After that dissertation, it becomes readily apparent that either buying a RTR car - or a kit is much easier. For those of you with lots of spare time on your hands (and a source of epoxy and BBs/shot), give it a try and get back to us.

Regards,
Ray

PS: 'Have done the "adding solder to the frame" operation years ago; but found that you really can't add much weight without a significant amount of solder.
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
Len

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« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2013, 11:14:07 AM »

I have a simple solution for assembled tank cars, using BB's as the weight.

Drill a hole large enough for the BB's through the center sill of the car into the body. Use some old sprue to make a plug for the hole when your done.

Weigh out enough BB's for the weight you're shooting for. then load the BB's into the car body. I found a small funnel somewhere that works great for this, or make your own from card stock.

Squeeze some white glue through the hole, this will keep the BB's from rattling around.

Close the hole with the plug you made earlier and some plastic cement.

Shake the car to distrube the white glue over the BB's, then let the car set upright overnight to let the white glue set up.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

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« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2013, 11:21:18 AM »

Thank you Ray!  All good suggestions, right down to looking into RTR rolling stock instead.  If one were to invest the time, what kind/brand of epoxy would you recommend?
I like your suggestions as well Len.   What kind of glue or epoxy would you recommend?
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jward


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« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2013, 08:01:00 PM »

a much cheaper way of weighting cars is to use pennies. that's about 5c per ounce. they only way you can get cheaper is if somebody gives you the weights.

I find that keeping the weight as low as possible hel[s with the stability of the car. for covered hoppers this means gluing the pennies into the hopper bottoms inside the car. I also find that the nmra weights are a good benchmark, not set in stone. I weight my cars to at least nmra specs, preferably a little more.

weighting open top cars can be a problem, as there is usually little you can do to conceal the weight.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2013, 08:08:26 PM »

Thanks Jeff.
This is like Deja Vu all over again.  Most of us chatted about the same topic a year or so ago, with a lot of the same suggestions/recommendations.
I find that while some added weight is needed to lesser expensive or older model cars, more or NMRA standards aren't necessarily needed to get to a good running car.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #23 on: August 24, 2013, 08:52:04 PM »

I also live with a pro-caulker who uses a very fluid caulk I have issues with. He uses it without incident)  How about filling with coins first then pumping in some "goo" ? Any how good luck Don.

GG1-

Yes. Some pros have and use materials which we DYI-ers, regardless of how talented, neither understand well or can use effectively. It's what separates us from the pros.

I'd be reluctant to put the coins in first and then add the goop because I'd be afraid of leaving some coins loose and rattling around inside. You hardly ever hear a tank car with rattles inside. This may be one of the few exceptions to the adage about everything having a prototype somewhere.
                                                                                                                                    -- D
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jward


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« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2013, 10:32:45 PM »

what I do for tank cars is glue 4 or 5 pennies together then superglue them on edge at each end of the car.


the photo shows the concept as applied to a Bachmann standard line tanker.

as for assorted rattles in tank cars, I can tell when one of the empty oil trains rolls by the house by the various odd noises echoing in the cars. empty tankers really do rattle and squeak.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Doneldon

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« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2013, 03:55:46 AM »

as for assorted rattles in tank cars, I can tell when one of the empty oil trains rolls by the house by the various odd noises echoing in the cars. empty tankers really do rattle and squeak.

jeff-

Clanking and squeaking, sure, but rattles coming from inside the tank? I don't think so.

                                                                                                                        -- D
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2013, 06:22:48 AM »

I think Len has the best idea, BBs, white glue and a small hole. K.I.S.S.-ed it he did.
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jbrock27

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« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2013, 07:03:11 AM »

GG1, I agree with K.I.S.S.  Makes life a whole lot easier.

Jeff, thank you for the pic.  What brand are the silver wheels pictured on the tanker?   Metal too, I imagine?
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Woody Elmore

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« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2013, 08:26:27 AM »

I forgot my weighting adventures using used linotype sections. These were made from a lead alloy and were just the thing to weight down HO cars.  They came in different lenths, were about an eighth of an inch thick and one inch wide. I used to cut them up glue them into the open places under flat cars and saw them into strips for other applications.

Linotype  composing for newspapers has gone the way of the CB radio, cars with no cup holders and people who controlled little kids in restaurants.

As the song said - "Those were the days, my friend..."
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jbrock27

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« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2013, 08:45:25 AM »

..."I thought they would never end, na, na, na, na,..."

Wood, can Linotype still be found anywhere?  Sounds like from what you say, it cannot.  Am I wrong?
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