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Author Topic: Bachmann Prussia too light/old to worl well?  (Read 8134 times)
WriterGal

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« on: January 07, 2014, 09:26:01 PM »

Okay, I found a Bachmann Prussia HO Scale Electric Train Set 40-0155 on ebay as well. There are a few different listings of "new" but old stock. Again, are these going to be "cute" but not good in operation as the De Witt? I have looked at the Civil War trains but am trying to avoid a war/battle theme. Thanks so much for all of the information!  Smiley
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WriterGal
jward


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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2014, 09:35:21 PM »

I don't have a Prussia so I can't comment on how it runs.

as for the civil war trains, keep in mind that you don't have to have a civil war theme to use these trains. the equipment, with a change in road name, would be appropriate for the transcontinental railroad, or any railroad from the time period.

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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
WriterGal

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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2014, 09:48:36 PM »

Jeffery , thanks for your suggestion about using the Civil War train as a transcontinental train. If I cannot find other trains of an earlier period, I may do just that.  Smiley Here is the ebay link for a Prussia. 

Bachmann The Prussia HO Scale Electric Train Set 40-0155  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bachmann-The-Prussia-HO-Scale-Electric-Train-Set-40-0155-New-In-Box-Ready-To-Run-/191006625953?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item2c78e1d0a1
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WriterGal
richg
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2014, 10:04:10 PM »

I don't have a Prussia so I can't comment on how it runs.

as for the civil war trains, keep in mind that you don't have to have a civil war theme to use these trains. the equipment, with a change in road name, would be appropriate for the transcontinental railroad, or any railroad from the time period.



Not a Bachmann tender drive 4-4-0 but the same era as the Bachmann 4-4-0, The Bachmann 4-4-0, American tender drive would be appropriate for a transcontinental train. The UP Photographers car was used for picture taking on the transcontinental project out west.



The Mantua Civil War General, 4-4-0 would be to old for transcontinental.

Rich
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 10:08:54 PM by richg » Logged
richg
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2014, 10:14:57 PM »

In the background is a Civil War American with wood tender load. It had the General name on it but I ground it off with a Dremel and router bit to make it a generic old time 1855 loco on my layout for switching purposes. It was in the middle of being painted.
It is a tender drive also.



Rich
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WriterGal

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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2014, 10:33:53 PM »

Rich, thanks so much for posting these pictures. I love those trains. Do you reckon there are more like them to be had or are they old enough it would be hard to find any?  Smiley
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WriterGal
Doneldon

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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2014, 05:40:17 AM »

Writer-

Alas, yes, the Prussian presents the same challenges as the DeWitt Clinton and the early B&O set.

                                                                                                                                       -- D
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jward


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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2014, 09:12:33 AM »

rich,
love the camel. what loco did you use for the drive? I assume the body is scratchbuilt.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2014, 01:02:17 PM »

as for the civil war trains, keep in mind that you don't have to have a civil war theme to use these trains. the equipment, with a change in road name, would be appropriate for the transcontinental railroad, or any railroad from the time period.

The Mantua Civil War General, 4-4-0 would be to old for transcontinental.

Rich

Has anybody ever set a "General" next to the Bachmann "Jupiter" or "No. 119"? How do they compare in size? Which is actually scaled more acurately?

Suddenly occurred to me to wonder. ...
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richg
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2014, 06:56:56 PM »

Rich, thanks so much for posting these pictures. I love those trains. Do you reckon there are more like them to be had or are they old enough it would be hard to find any?  Smiley

The Camel is from a bash project. A MDC old time 2-8-0.
Over size though.
The Camels only had 43 inch drivers. Mine are 51 inch drivers. The plastic smokebox shell was slit and removed. Reversed so the stack is right at the front of the boiler like the prototype.
Some Camels had the headlight on the left side. Some had it right at the front. I have a bunch of photos. Might have depended on the drivers preference. Many locos at the time, the driver had his preference for different things on the loco.




The General is a Model Power Mantua. I think they are still for sale.

Rich
« Last Edit: January 10, 2014, 07:00:19 PM by richg » Logged
richg
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2014, 07:16:48 PM »

The Winans Camel bash was from an article in Sept 1999, RMC.
The Winans Camels were rather crudely made from a couple authors in that era. They were a slow, under 10 mph workhorse. Mainly for pulling hard coal drags.
The B&O had nearly 200.
The PRR had six and converted them to 2-6-0s by pulling the second set of drivers and modifying the side rods.
Two other companies made their versions of the Camel and were 4-6-0's. Davis and Hayes as I recall.

Rich
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Doneldon

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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2014, 09:05:33 PM »

Has anybody ever set a "General" next to the Bachmann "Jupiter" or "No. 119"? How do they compare in size? Which is actually scaled more accurately?

Suddenly occurred to me to wonder. ...

Rich-

They are pretty much the same size, given the reality that the dimensions are often fudged a little on these small locomotives. Remember that Promontory Point was just four years after the Civil War when the General had its moment in the spotlight. The General and one of the Golden pike locos (#119) were both built in the Rogers shops; The Jupiter was erected by the Schenectady shops. The General was older (1855) than the other two (both 1868) but all had long careers after their stardom. The General was scrapped in 1891, the Jupiter in 1909 and the 119 in 1903.
                                                                                                                                                                       -- D
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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2014, 01:00:15 PM »

Has anybody ever set a "General" next to the Bachmann "Jupiter" or "No. 119"? How do they compare in size? Which is actually scaled more accurately?

Suddenly occurred to me to wonder. ...

Rich-

They are pretty much the same size, given the reality that the dimensions are often fudged a little on these small locomotives. Remember that Promontory Point was just four years after the Civil War when the General had its moment in the spotlight. The General and one of the Golden pike locos (#119) were both built in the Rogers shops; The Jupiter was erected by the Schenectady shops. The General was older (1855) than the other two (both 1868) but all had long careers after their stardom. The General was scrapped in 1891, the Jupiter in 1909 and the 119 in 1903.
                                                                                                                                                                       -- D


Thanks. I knew the "General" had a long postwar career, but it amazes me how long these other engines lasted after their moment of glory.

JBJ
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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2014, 02:05:10 PM »

The General, and the Texas, both from the Great Locomotive Chase, still exist in museums although modified rebuilds.

Love those camels.
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richg
Guest
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2014, 02:33:30 PM »

They sure do. I have seen both. Both were modified after the war.

S.O.P. Standard Operating Procedure. Google them if in doubt.

Rich
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