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Author Topic: 3-truck Shay drivetrain and lubrication  (Read 2632 times)
SN711

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« on: September 30, 2014, 04:57:27 PM »

I am helping a local business get their Bachmann 3-truck Shay locomotive up and running again. My question: Is the tender supposed to connect (add power to) the drivetrain? The drive shaft is there and connected, but appears to freewheel. The front two trucks are directly connected to each other via the drive shaft. The tender is providing pulling power, but appears to be independent and the drive shaft to/from it is just for appearances. Is this the way it is supposed to be? And, if not, should it be an important issue?

They have used who-knows-what to terribly over lubricate it. I have watched the videos on how to properly lubricate everything, but are there any suggestions on how to clean up the greasy, oily mess before I do so?

Thanks for any advice you can give me!
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Kevin Strong


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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2014, 01:41:57 AM »

The driveline on the side of the Shay is purely cosmetic. Each truck has its own motor which powers the wheels. One of the trucks (I forget which) provides power to the driveline so it moves with the locomotive. The other two trucks have no connection to it.

To clean up the greasy, oily mess, you can use any regular kitchen cleaner or something of that ilk.

Later,

K
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tac

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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2014, 02:30:16 PM »

Kevin is right.  The power truck for the drive-line is the one under the cab - the other two are just along for the ride, so to speak.

There is a pretty detailed régime of lubrication for this very complex locomotive, using LaBelle lubricants, that really needs to be paid close attention to to reduce long-term wear on all the many wiggly bits.  The DVD that comes in the packaging is THE handbook here.

tac
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SN711

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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2014, 03:59:29 PM »

Thanks to both of you for the information. After checking the engine further, I see what you both are telling me - driveshaft is just for looks, except to actuate the piston rods. I did my best to lubricate all the bearings and gears, as the YouTube videos explained and the engine is up, running, and back in service! It pulls a consist of flatcars on an overhead track in a local feed store. I got tired of not seeing it run and volunteered for at least a year to help diagnose/fix problems they were having. Dust, track corrosion, and overlubricating were the culprits. Very gratifying to be able to solve the mystery and see positive results. Thanks again!

George
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Joe Zullo

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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2014, 11:19:37 AM »

How about making a video of this setup? We'd love to see it in action.  Roll Eyes
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charon
G gauge since 1972


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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2014, 12:25:41 PM »

George,
I'm with Joe, can you post a video or at least some pix of the train in action?
Thanks,
Chuck
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Mesquite Short Line
Joe Satnik


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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2014, 06:22:50 PM »

Dear George,

I commend you for volunteering to help, and congratulate you on your success. 



Sincerely,

Joe Satnik

Perhaps someone handy could create a virtual medal with Bach-Man's image on it. 

He is, of course, the original model train trouble-shooting super-hero...
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
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