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| | |-+  New style Bachmann magnetic couplers vs. older horn style
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Author Topic: New style Bachmann magnetic couplers vs. older horn style  (Read 20068 times)
rogertra


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« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2014, 12:22:25 AM »

Ahh yes, ye old transition car...

That doesn't work if you use a system of prototypical car forwarding, does it?

Works fine where you just grab a bunch of freight cars and like like to run trains with no purpose but not very well if you try to emulate the prototype.  The prototype blocks trains by destination so you never know what car will be coupled next to or between what car.

Speaking as someone who has around 200 freight cars in general service.

Cheers.

Roger T.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 02:04:50 PM by rogertra » Logged

jbrock27

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« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2014, 07:48:52 AM »

Indeed.

Can I surmise you are also addressing your point to Mr. Ward as well as anyone else who may employ a transition car?

One of the distinct differences I guess, between model railroaders and railroad modelers.

Now if you'll excuse me, I am going to run some old time passenger cars behind one of my technotoaster, 6 axle diesels... Grin  
« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 11:11:49 AM by jbrock27 » Logged

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rogertra


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« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2014, 02:10:10 PM »

Indeed.

Can I surmise you are also addressing your point to Mr. Ward as well as anyone else who may employ a transition car?

One of the distinct differences I guess, between model railroaders and railroad modelers.

Now if you'll excuse me, I am going to run some old time passenger cars behind one of my technotoaster, 6 axle diesels... Grin  

Have fun, that's what it's all about.

Cheers

Roger T.
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jward


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« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2014, 02:57:41 PM »

Ahh yes, ye old transition car...

That doesn't work if you use a system of prototypical car forwarding, does it?

Works fine where you just grab a bunch of freight cars and like like to run trains with no purpose but not very well if you try to emulate the prototype.  The prototype blocks trains by destination so you never know what car will be coupled next to or between what car.

Speaking as someone who has around 200 freight cars in general service.

Cheers.

Roger T.

obviously you've never herd of idler cars. a good example of this would have been the high and wide loads, or the current oil trains. certain loads require spacer or idler cars for reasons of safety or weight distribution. those could easily be adapted to model railroading.
 
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2014, 04:22:02 PM »

Roge, I will,  thank you.  Just not with either of those as I don't have either one to run Wink
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jbrock27

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« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2014, 10:41:10 PM »

I may be causing some confusion here-I used the word "transition" in conjunction with the word "car" not meaning to use it as a proper name (noun) to refer to the car bearing that proper name.  
I call "conversion" cars "transition" cars bc they transition or join, cars that have HHs to ones that have knuckle couplers bc they are set up at one end with a HH and the other w/a knuckle coupler.  My apologies for any confusion.

This is what I mean if I was not clear: http://modeltrains.about.com/od/tmodelrailroadterms/g/Transition-Car.htm

I don't know I have ever heard them called "conversion" cars.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 10:47:28 PM by jbrock27 » Logged

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jward


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« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2014, 11:13:17 AM »

Growing up in a model railroading family we always called  them conversion cars. Transition cars were bilevel passenger cars with low end doors on one end which were used to connect single level and bilevel cars.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2014, 12:21:55 PM »

Growing up in a model railroading family

So you have mentioned many, many times in the past.  Congratulations (?) I guess.  I suppose this is why I never heard them referred to as "conversion" cars.  I feel such a loss...but I learned a new term today so thank you.

I wonder if the guy who wrote the above article I posted the link to, grew up in a "model railroading family"?  Or, does it really matter one iota?  
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 03:36:30 PM by jbrock27 » Logged

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jward


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« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2014, 03:04:47 AM »

a bing search for transition car turned up these:
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=transition+car&id=54ED5899940006BB777F79F938128C3DAC3C81A8&FORM=IQFRBA
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2014, 06:43:24 AM »

For real Jeff??

And a GOOGLE search under "conversion car" turned up these:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Conversion+Car&rlz=1C1OPRA_enUS586US586&es_sm=93&biw=1366&bih=667&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=3jVGVLjCHc

Did you not look at the first link I provided?

But beside that, does any of this make either of us "right"?  Or either of us "wrong"?  And does that matter to anyone?

Does anyone really care what to call a piece of rolling stock that has 2 different kinds of couplers at either end? 

Seriously Roll Eyes
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jward


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« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2014, 11:05:22 AM »

nice. i like your conversion cars
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2014, 01:09:32 PM »

Thanks, and I like your transition cars.
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Jhanecker2

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« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2014, 08:06:55 PM »

to Jbrock27 & jward your searches  were both interesting .    It however does bring up the point that  one must always be careful how one phrases a question to a search engine .  Marvels  that they are they are not really intelligent and one must truly  meticulously  define the exact parameters of what we are really searching for . Though it is interesting to see how machine logic interprets your request .  Have fun every answer opens up new questions . John 2 .
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jward


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« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2014, 08:53:46 PM »

yes it does open up new questions. sometimes i think we all take this hobby too seriously, and lose sight of the fact that it is supposed to be fun.  it is possible to get the details correct down to the last rivet, and still lose the context for its very existence.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
MarkInLA

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« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2014, 05:46:12 AM »

 Roll Eyes
The question should be: -

"Why are you purchasing equipment that old and that doesn't come up to the standards expected today of model railroad equipment?"

Buying for price in old model railroad equipment can only lead to disappointment, as we've seen numerous times on this board, especially when it comes to what were considered "entry level" products.

Cheers

Roger T.


Dan, Roger is spot on here ! If you think buying old old MRR rolling stock with horn hook couplers is a good way to save money, you are sadly mistaken.. Not only do old cars and engines have those horrid couplers, their wheels have flanges we now call pizza cutters. A real flange is about 1.5 to maybe 2 inches above the wheel tread. Pizza cutters scale out  in HO to be around 6 to 8 inches deep. If you begin buying modern Atlas or more expensive track your flanges will hit the spike heads if not worse. You've been out of touch for 30 years ! Forget that old clunky stuff and ease back into the hobby following today's standards: In HO, buy code 83 or smaller rail height track. Buy contemporary cars and locos which have way way more realistic appointments and detail on them: Engines with great motors and pick up, well rolling cars with operating knuckle couplers like the 1:1 scale has, and all having today's flanges. Even analog power to tracks and motors is slowly disappearing in favor of digital command  control, DCC. Too much to explain this here so I'd advise you purchase a few 'how to' books or mags at the train shop or on-line so you are up on the current state of the art..No put down meant here. We are giving you a heads up so as you don't make too many disappointing decisions; decisions most of us have had to learn the hard way from, too.. Welcome aboard, Mark
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