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Author Topic: Dullcote Over Windows  (Read 3993 times)
jonathan


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« on: November 06, 2014, 06:00:53 AM »

A little background to go with my question:

This is a staging yard.  Doesn't get used much. I normally have a lot of rolling stock on the 8 tracks.  The longest ones holding passenger cars. Which explains the Union Station up top:


Unfortunately, I can't hide the yard in another room or some other clever means.  I am forced to put scenery on it, which I have been doing, slowly, over the past several years.  AND, I keep changing my mind and fiddling with the scenery elements.

I have a turnaround track I wish to hide behind the scenery.  I am putting in some half-buildings as part of the backdrop as you can see in these photos:











What I would like to do is put lighting inside the background buildings, at the same time, hiding the turnaround track.  My initial thought is to spray dullcote over the buildings, including the window glazing.  My guess is the glazing will just turn foggy, but still let some light through.  An added bonus being no worries about inside details.

Has anybody ever done this?

Regards,

Jonathan
« Last Edit: November 06, 2014, 06:08:36 AM by jonathan » Logged
BaltoOhioRRfan


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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2014, 08:14:47 AM »

I don't think it will make em foggy, i've gotten overcoats on windows before and they still are clear.
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Emily C.
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Bucksco

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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2014, 09:40:42 AM »

Dullcote will fog the windows. Another alternative might be to use a translucent type of paint. "Clear" colors are made by Tamiya in their acrylic paint line that can be sprayed on with an airbrush. They have one called "Smoke" which can be layered on to achieve a nice dark effect but still allow light to show through.
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Trainman203

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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2014, 06:12:18 PM »

I've dullcoted windows on old warehouses.  In real life they were always dirty and that makes them look real.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
AGSB
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2014, 06:59:41 PM »

Spray the Dulcoat on the inside of the window glazing, let it dry and spray a second light coat. that will fog the windows and leave the outside clear and smooth.
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jonathan


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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2014, 06:04:59 AM »

Many thanks for your responses. That bit of help made me brave enough to try the dullcote.  I like the results.

For a few quick photos, I stuck a couple of LED flashlights behind the structures.  It will look much better with well placed lighting.  However, I like the effect:











Thanks again for helping me make progress.

Regards,

Jonathan
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jonathan


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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2014, 06:25:14 AM »

Well, this project is coming along.  Still have to line up the structures and add a few more lights, but you get the idea...

Regards,

Jonathan







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electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2014, 09:05:52 AM »

Jonathan';
I saw an idea not too long ago in MR or RMC dealing with interiors.  My thought is to put the LED system on the "Ceilings", and put black Strathmore or Bristol board in as a sort of block.  The idea of glaringly bright lights coming from the interior of a commercial/industrial facility doesn't sit right with me, so I have tried this with a good success. 
Also, I try not to have the outside lighting too bright.  I equate lighting with sound; in that my locomotives are not so loud as they call direct attention to them; but to rather blend in with the ambiance.  I do that with lighting as well.
My first two layouts were quite a learning process, and I will carry that onto this next layout.
Rich
(SGT C)
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2014, 01:16:29 PM »

Jonathan - The Dullcote seems to have turned out fine...I'll put that one into the 'files' as it beats using translucent tape (...only on smaller windows). For more realistic lighting, you may want to consider LEDs. With the Christmas holidays upon us, many stores have warm-white LED Christmas lights available...at attractive prices (I got mine from Big Lots). I have procurred several strings of both warm white, and blue (to be used for nighttime running) for use on my Monks Island Railway. Just a thought Jon.

Happy Holidays everyone,
Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2014, 03:56:02 PM »

Jonathan and all;
One thing I did do on the "industrial glass" is to "stain" some of the panes with some dye-greens and blues are good.
Sarge C
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