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Author Topic: Warranty question for burned out motor  (Read 5655 times)
Jim C.

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« on: January 02, 2015, 12:03:21 AM »

Hello!

I have a GP50 diesel with a burned out motor, it may have been from lube in the gears, so I cleaned it out and was able to turn the shaft in the motor.  When I tested the motor (at half throttle or about 8 volts), it worked, but immediately began sparking and smoking.  I understand per the instructions that came with the engine, that the motor should have a lifetime warranty, I hope this applies?  Any help would be appreciated.
 
If I were to send it back, would I need to send the entire engine, or could I just send the motor?  Also - I see a new motor is only $10.00, but the part # on this site is 9902 vs. the part # in my instructions of 9915.  I do believe it's the same motor from the photo, but curious why the # variance?
  
Thanks in advance, Jim
« Last Edit: January 02, 2015, 12:05:25 AM by Jim C. » Logged
ACY


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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2015, 12:18:35 AM »

For warranty service you need to send in the whole locomotive unless you have approval to send in everything but the shell if it is custom detailed or painted. You must also send in the service fee of $25 with the locomotive. It would be better for you to just buy the part you need if it is less than the repair fee if you are certain of the problem.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2015, 12:33:05 AM »

Jim-

Free warranty service applies for the first year only and to the first owner only. Thus, you would need your original
receipt and warranty card to substantiate your repair claim. It looks like you can buy a replacement motor for considerably
less than the cost of the out-of-warranty service. Seems like a no-brainer to me.
                                                                                                                         -- D
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jbrock27

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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2015, 08:43:58 PM »

Jimmy, how do you think the motor burned out to begin with?  I don't think lube in the gears, which is where lube belongs, would do it.
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Jim C.

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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2015, 09:26:20 PM »

Agreed that a new one is the obvious choice, and hopefully the difference in part #'s doesn't mean anything.  The gear lube was likely hardened from sitting for two years (that's my theory anyway).  Sucks that it's about 6 years old, but only used for a few holiday seasons...

I did buy another engine, as this happened right before Christmas (of course), a Micro - wow, what a price difference! I paid $100.00, I hope the quality matches the price!  I will still buy the Bachmann replacement motor to use as a back up though, seems worth it for $10.00 (and whatever tax, shipping, etc. will be). 

The quick feedback is much appreciated everyone, thanks and have a great New Year!

-Jim
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Jim C.

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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2015, 12:29:31 PM »

Quick question, since I cleaned out the old gear lube, I was thinking to just put a small amount on my finger tip and smearing a little on the gears - the hobby shop cautioned me not to go overboard and have the same thing happen again.  He indicated that often the factory (China) sometimes overdoes it too.  Would anyone agree?
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jbrock27

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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2015, 01:04:40 PM »

I would agree that most locos come overlubed from the manufacturer.   Is it possible for you to remove the wheelsets and gears and give the plastic gears a good cleaning in soapy water and old toothbrush?  If you do take them apart, you should have a gauge to help put the wheelsets back together the correct distance apart.
I like to use a fishing reel Teflon based grease for gears.  It is inexpensive and very easy to find at places like Walfart and Kmart. 
Until reading what you wrote last night, I had never heard of a grease used by a manufacturer that got so thick with age that it would actually destroy a motor.  Wow Shocked
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Jim C.

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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2015, 01:18:14 PM »

I have a tube of hobby lithium grease on hand, but after reading the instructions again I see that they recommend dipping a toothpick in a light oil to lube the gears, that sounds good to me.  I cleaned everything with quick dry electric cleaner, seemed to work really well and get into the tiny areas of the gear teeth.  I'm a gearhead too, and swear by Rislone, maybe I'll use that oil since it's pretty thin.  I just want to prep it properly before putting it away for next year.

I also just ordered the new motor too, should be here later next week I'm guessing...that should just drop in w/o any prep work I presume too?   Thanks again!
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jbrock27

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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2015, 01:32:01 PM »

I like to save oil for metal, like bearings, motor shafts and stick with grease for gears.  The grease I mentioned will not repeat the performance of what you started out with, once meshed with the gears, it is pretty liquidity but only after it has spread very evenly.  What I don't like about oil for plastic gears or for worms for that matter, is, that it is runny enough that it is harder to get the even distribution.  Plus, once you put it away, by the time you take it out again, that oil, due to gravity, is going to run to somewhere else while the loco is sitting in it's box and you may have to reapply when you take the loco back out at holiday time to run around the tree or menorah or whatever next year.  The oil will also make a mess when it "drifts" some where else.
But, each to his own.
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jbrock27

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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2015, 01:36:14 PM »

...should just drop in w/o any prep work I presume too?

One would hope.

It just dawned on me, this Topic should be over in "N".
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Doneldon

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« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2015, 12:36:55 AM »

Jim-

I've certainly seen the Rislone name around for many years but I don't know if it is plastic safe. Most lubes are
safe for nylon gears but it can get splashed around on the styrene and other plastics where it could lead to difficulties.
I wouldn't use it unless it's marked as plastic safe.
                                                                            -- D

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Len

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« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2015, 01:50:31 AM »

If you can find it, I use plastic safe LaBelle 106 grease on my HO loco gears, and it works very well.

What I don't understand is how old grease would burn out a motor? Unless it was the really old, 50's vintage, Lionel parafin based grease that turns into cement with age.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

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« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2015, 02:49:48 PM »

I did not understand that either Len.  My first post wondering why a major manufacturer would use such stuff, was deleted.
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Jim C.

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« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2015, 11:06:15 PM »

Thanks gentlemen, I'll verify whatever I use is plastic safe first. 

The gear lube was kinda "gunky", but I could still turn it with my finger, as I could the motor.  Given the sparks flying when I jumped the motor directly with power, I'm guessing the motor may be the true culprit...

-Jim
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