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Author Topic: planning a new layout / layout tables  (Read 20967 times)
Jerrys HO
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« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2015, 06:24:09 PM »

Although you said you are not good with wood work, it may be easier than you think. Most are not born with these skills and when they start a project they are amazed how simple and fun it can be. We are not trying to build cabinets just a flat piece of wood sitting on some legs that if you put a skirt around it you will never see it. Shoot mine has a lot of flaws, that's what they make planer's and sander's for Grin.
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jbrock27

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« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2015, 06:32:22 PM »

I've always like that series of vids!
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jbrock27

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« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2015, 06:53:33 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-LxY-P2n-g
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en4cer

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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2015, 11:05:51 PM »

One thing I could add to the conversation would be to add casters to the bottom of the legs. This would make it possible to move the table or tables out from the wall so you can access the back side of the layout. Also you mentioned that you would be in an apartment and this would help to lessen the wear and tear on the apartment floor and walls.
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jward


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« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2015, 11:52:55 PM »

bill how big is the room you are going to use?
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Doneldon

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« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2015, 12:09:53 AM »

Bill-

I remember when the General Manager granted me territorial rights to an extra bedroom for a train room. What a wonderful feeling! And now you are the recipient of the same great news. Congratulations!

And now, not from envy, I swear, a small monkey wrench in your plans: Four-by-eight tables and ping pong tables are rarely the best for layouts which have their own rooms. An around-the-walls arrangement almost always provides more and better raw area for a layout, longer mainline runs, superior operations and better access. Such layouts are often less expensive to build, too. May I urge you to at least consider an around-the-walls layout?

And some help, too. Check any recent MR, RMC or MRN and you'll find an add for a company t(he name escapes me right now) which makes modular pieces for assembling model railroad frameworks. I suspect the system is more expensive than using raw lumber but you may be willing to pay for the convenience. However, I can assure you that there is very little complexity in building comparatively narrow shelves along a wall with products from a lumber yard. You could conceivably use the prefab units for wider areas and stick-built narrow (anything up to 18" or so) shelves to connect the more developed or scenic parts.

Whatever you do, please let us know how things are going.
                                                                                          -- D
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Len

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« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2015, 01:34:32 AM »

If you have a whole room to work with, I highly recommend:

Kalbach Publishing's "Basic Model Railroad Benchwork, 2nd Edition", Item#: 12469,  ISBN: 9780890248362

Particularly the section on L-girder benchwork, which is very flexible, great for around the room layouts, and less expensive than a 4x8, as you don't need to a big sheet of plywood.

A description from the Kalmbach web site: http://www.kalmbachstore.com/12469.html

If you LHS doesn't have it, you can order it at a book store using the ISBN, or through Amazon using the item #. Kalmbach also offers a number of other books on different aspects of the hobby, e.g., scenary, railroad structures, layouts, bridges, locomotive detailing, etc.

Len
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Trainman203

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« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2015, 01:05:39 PM »

I really dislike carpentry. I am very nervous about power tools.  My uncle cut off a finger in his shop and I had a skil saw kick back on me once.  

 I built a long shelf layout on the 36" high version of these:

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=64014-40955-MP-OT00187&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=50147628&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

Never cut a board anywhere to have my layout using these.

You don't have to be a carpenter to have a model railroad.  These work fine, can be reused anywhere later on, and allow a layout that, if designed right, can be demobilized and out of the house in a couple of hours ...... and rebuilt somewhere else at little or no cost.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 01:08:37 PM by Trainman203 » Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Len

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« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2015, 01:18:14 PM »

You can use stock lengths (4', 6', 8', etc.) of 1x2 and 1x3 for building L-girder tables and usually not have to cut anything.

Worst case, a small hand saw  like this http://www.homedepot.com/p/Stanley-FatMax-14-in-Back-Saw-17-202/203789674 works fine on 1x2 & 1x3 boards.

Len
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2015, 02:25:55 PM »

Trainman 203,
I bet that got a little pricey.
As far as being concerned about cutting wood, there are other options like your local supply store will cut to size for you. All you have to do is assemble. Cost a little more than DIY but cheaper than $60.00 shelving units.
Just get your dimensions and take them to your local supply house such as Home Depot or Lowes and Ace (are there any left?) and they can cut and help you on way's and supplies needed to assemble.
Although most layouts are built with 1x2's 3's and 4"s, I preferred 2x4's so when my train is not in operation I can park my cars on top Grin. (just kidding sort of, I have my r/c collection sitting on them right now).
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jbrock27

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« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2015, 02:47:55 PM »

BG did state in his first post on this topic that he wished to utilize 22" R curves.

I good reminder by Jerry that it is easy peasy to have lumber cut for you at a lumber supply or home improvement store.  Many folks overlook they have this option available to them.

I love hand tools and power tools Cheesy
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Trainman203

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« Reply #26 on: January 04, 2015, 03:14:38 PM »

Not a whole lot more pricey than if you included buying all those needed power tools, Jerry.  Plus, when I move soon, I can take it all with me.  The second home around, my benchworh will nearly if not completely cost free.

Another thing to remember is that the original poster said he lived in an apartment, I think.  Who wants to live next door to a wood shop with all that carpentry going on for days and weeks?

Some more pluses.  I got to keep all my fingers.  I didn't have sawdust all over the house.  I got my layout surface ready in two evenings.

I paid about 40 bucks each for the units at 36 " high.  I have eight of them.  Used twice, with no power tools, this is certainly cost competitive with standard wood  benchwork.  And, since the layout is in the house, the tables look like furniture.  How much l-girder bench work truthfully looks like furniture. 
I've seen guys build fine cabinetry below their layouts. I suspect most modelers aren't that good at it.

I'm more than satisfied with what I have.  It isn't for a room filling permanent huge pike.  But it's pretty good for small apartment type deals.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
jbrock27

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« Reply #27 on: January 04, 2015, 03:25:11 PM »

...a wood shop with all that carpentry going on for days and weeks?  I got to keep all my fingers.  I didn't have sawdust all over the house.

Days and weeks?!?  You make is sound as though this would be going on this long, non stop.  Seems a bit overboard.  I don't think Bill said he was moving to an assisted living facility Cheesy  Is no one who lives in apartment allowed to make any noise for a short period of time?  What about these same types of noises that occur in close proximity to a residence?

I have all my fingers too Grin

And I find a dust pan, brush and vacumm are great for getting up sawdust Grin
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 03:28:14 PM by jbrock27 » Logged

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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #28 on: January 04, 2015, 03:30:29 PM »

Trainman203
I am not saying there is anything wrong with your waybut I feel it can get pricey.
Most if not all my lumber was free from construction sites that if asked will gladly give you the scraps or leftovers. They may even cut some to size for you for free!
I am lucky to have all the tools needed in my possession or readily available to me and I still have all my fingers and toes!
I usually make all cuts outside and assemble inside even though it is in my detached garage I hate sawdust mess.
There is also the option of modules which most modelers doing train shows do for assembly and dis assembly ease, which can be adopted to the apartment lifestyle.
All suggestions are welcome so Bill can make the choice he wishes to go and will have some pro's and con's to read about.
Jerry
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Trainman203

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« Reply #29 on: January 04, 2015, 03:42:12 PM »

Brock in my experience layouts take some time to build especially if you have a job, a family, and other interests.  I thought Bill said he lived in an apartment.  I wouldn't want to live next door to a guy doing heavy carpentry, then possibly finish carpentry, on the other side of a 2x4 wall.  I've lived in  apartments next door to people who'd complain if your pet rock sneezed.  If you are in your own home it is better of course.

Dust gets into furniture, window blinds, on top of every little ledge, top of casework, I mean everything.  My layouts have never been in dedicated rooms I could close off.  I've lived through two long term on going renovations in my house.  Aint doin no mo work.  Or making any more.  Or fooling with power tools, the saw kick back was enough once.

You folks that like tools and  making work for yourselves, have at it.  Or, even better, come over and build my next layout!  There's room for everyone to have fun in model railroading  however they find it.  Mine comes in running the railroad rather than getting ready to run the railroad.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
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