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Author Topic: E-Z track turnout wiring  (Read 5790 times)
MrMoose
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« on: January 07, 2015, 09:47:02 AM »

Hi,
I want to replace the switch that comes with the remote turn out to a DPDT switch. I understand how to wire a momentary DPDT switch to operate the turnout but I don't understand how to wire the three wires that the turnout uses to the DPDT switch.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2015, 10:25:35 AM »

Moosie-

The center terminal on the remote turnout is the neutral or common. One of the others is for the straight track; the
other is for the diverging track. If you get the directions wrong, just exchange them.
                                                                                                                              -- D
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Len

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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2015, 10:42:30 AM »

I can tell you from personal experience, these work quite well: http://www.grainger.com/product/POWER-FIRST-Toggle-Switch-2VLT2

Unless you want the extra contacts for signal lights, you only need a SPDT Momentary On-Off-On switch, not a DPDT.

Tie all the center wires (common) together and connect to one side of your power supply. The outside wires go to the outer connectors on the SPDT switch. The switch center connectors can be "daisy chained" together, and connect to the other side of the power supply.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
MrMoose
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2015, 10:46:35 AM »

Thanks guys, I thought that the center wire was common but wasn't sure.
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Irbricksceo


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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2015, 01:35:19 PM »

I might just have to do this as well
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jbrock27

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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2015, 01:54:53 PM »

Because you like the look of the toggle switch or you don't like the look of an Atlas #56 controller?
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Len

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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2015, 02:00:07 PM »

I prefer the toggle switches because you just have to tap them one way or the other. No sliding over, then pressing. And no burned out solinoids if someone, e.g., grandkids, sets something on the switch controller keeping the button pressed down.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2015, 02:05:08 PM »

Sure, I understand Len.  I was posing the question just to Brick as to why he felt the need to do this as well.

BTW, those toggles seem expensive.  Is that the going price?  I am going to implement some pushbutton momentaries in 2 colors to put on a control panel, myself.  The 2 colors will represent the 2 routs.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 03:05:39 PM by jbrock27 » Logged

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Irbricksceo


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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2015, 02:56:15 PM »

Couple of reasons. One, i Like the look and function of the toggles better, two, I lost two of my switch controllers and have one turnout  where the plug was severed anyway, and three, I bet I could wire both sides of the crossover to the same switch. Chalk it up to personal preference i guess.
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jbrock27

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« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2015, 03:03:44 PM »

Got it Brick.

Len, not for arguments sake, but can't grandkids make the same mistake of holding down the momentary toggle in one postion too long as well?
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Len

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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2015, 03:18:08 PM »

jbrock,

True, they could physically hold it to one side or the other.

But the problem I had, and why I switched to toggles, wasn't they were operating the switch on purpose for too long. They just kept setting things, mainly books, on top of the flat Atlas switch controllers. This would hold the button down, and I'd get fried switch machines.

The toggle handles, sticking straight up, are less inviting as a place to set things on.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2015, 03:42:29 PM »

Got it Len.  I have seen folks mount the #56s vertically along the frame of a layout; this would prevent anything from being laid on top of them.
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Len

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« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2015, 04:06:58 PM »

Might work, but I've gotten used to just flipping the toggle one way or the other. It just seems simpler than the 'slide/press' action of the #56, or equivalant, type of controller.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

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« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2015, 04:32:12 PM »

Oh yea, I am not trying to convince you to do anything different.  I was just putting that info out there for anyone who may want to consider that option, bc it does work.  Like I said, I think I am going to like the push buttons better as well.

The only problem I ever had with the 56s is some will no longer gang together using those right side tabs (forks) because they stopped conducting, for some reason.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 04:41:47 PM by jbrock27 » Logged

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jward


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« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2015, 09:04:39 PM »

Couple of reasons. One, i Like the look and function of the toggles better, two, I lost two of my switch controllers and have one turnout  where the plug was severed anyway, and three, I bet I could wire both sides of the crossover to the same switch. Chalk it up to personal preference i guess.


as long as your power supply has enough current to throw two switch motors simultaneously, you can wire both switches of a crossover together. I've done it many times. the mrc packs I used had enough juice to throw 3 motors, two threw the crossover switches, and the third was an atlas snap relay I used to power panel lights.

just make sure your are using the momentary toggles, the regular kind will burn out your switch motors.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
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