ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
February 22, 2020, 08:19:58 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  bachmann 40' single and three-dome tank cars
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: bachmann 40' single and three-dome tank cars  (Read 2783 times)
tgobbi

View Profile
« on: February 18, 2015, 11:23:44 PM »

Does anyone know what era the Bachmann 40' tank cars represent? I model the mid 20s and wonder if they'd look out of place. I'm not a stickler for exact prototype appearance but I'd prefer not to have cars that are glaringly too modern for my layout.

Thanx for any responses!
Logged
ACY


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2015, 11:38:09 PM »

Somewhere in the ballpark of 1950 I think
Logged
jbrock27

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2015, 11:47:44 PM »

Lots of times there will be a built date ("BLT.-  ") indicated somewhere on the side of a freight car.
Logged

Keep Calm and Carry On
Len

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2015, 03:54:18 AM »

You'll find some interesting history on tank cars manufactured by American Car Foundry (ACF) here:

http://www.richyodermodels.com/rym_fc_mcba_type2_history.htm

ACF held the patents for a number of tank car innovations. It should also be noted that capacity in gallons is the normal way to refer to tank car sizes.

As jbrock says, the only way to be sure is by checking the BLT date in the reporting date. About the only sure identifying factor is all welded bodies are from 1920 or later. But riveted bodies were still being built right up to the early WW-II.

Len
Logged

If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jbrock27

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2015, 08:18:49 AM »

Since we are on the topic and always wondered this but never took the time to look it up, which were produced first, the triple domes?
Logged

Keep Calm and Carry On
Len

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2015, 09:22:32 AM »

Single dome came first. Then somone came up with the idea of adding internal walls to create two or three compartments for differenct products, e.g., kerosense, fuel oil, lubricating oil, that might be going to the same place. Assuming it was capable of receiving two or three different products without switching the car.

That cut into the amount of each that could be carried by each car, so (unlike on our model RR's) multidome tankers weren't very popular with the real railroads. I think that's reflected in the reporting marks on most of those type cars ending with "X". Indicating they are owned by the shipper or a leasing company.

Since they are basically one-way loads, drained on arrival and sent back empty, tank cars in general aren't all that popular with railroads even today. And shipping charges for tankers have been known to reflect that.

Len
Logged

If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Trainman203

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2015, 12:59:00 PM »

Neither one are prototypical of anything, they are much too large.  These elephant sized tank cars have been around in one form or another by one manufacturer or another since the early 60's at least, I had them.
Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
jbrock27

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2015, 01:09:14 PM »

Thank you for the info Len and TM.

Since they are basically one-way loads, drained on arrival and sent back empty, tank cars in general aren't all that popular with railroads even today. And shipping charges for tankers have been known to reflect that.

Yes, I was aware of that aspect about tankers.

Logged

Keep Calm and Carry On
Trainman203

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2015, 07:50:25 PM »

Not only could tanks only handle one way dedicated loads, but they were limited by the ability to haul only one type load unless thoroughly cleaned.  Even at that, oil or chemical tanks couldn't be used for food grade products.  When you run model tank cars, you have to think about what they are hauling to where, and why they are on your railroad.  Actually, that's true for any freight car, if you are into realistic operation.
Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
jbrock27

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2015, 09:07:03 PM »

Myself, more into fun than realism but not so far that I run Techno Toasters pulling old time passenger cars.  I do try to be somewhat "Era consistent".
Logged

Keep Calm and Carry On
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!