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Author Topic: The Everything Thomas Thread  (Read 386610 times)
Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #60 on: November 01, 2015, 04:14:55 PM »

Does anybody know why Skarleoy's body piece is made of metal and not plastic? I did that a bit odd for a Model Railway Locomotive to be made of metal.

Actually, here in the UK at least, most bodies or running plates are starting to be made of metal - it adds much-needed weight to the models, which helps it grip the track. A model of an engine like Skarloey wouldn't be able to pull anything if it had a plastic-mould body, as it would be too light.

That's true. I haven't noticed any Locomotives in the UK with bodies made of metal. I guess it will be a bit odd first at first when I get my Bachmann Skarloey it having a metal body. It will feel like my childhood days again, with those die-cast metal ERTL Thomas & Friends trains again!

I hope the paint won't be painted on that it could be easily chipped or scratched. That will annoy me a lot.
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #61 on: November 01, 2015, 06:04:04 PM »

Chaz, will the NMRA reveal the new Bachmann Thomas products that were announced this year by next week? What all will you know by the NMRA?

Whichever products Bachmann announces this year that make it to the NMRA are usually the ones that get released by Christmas, those that are not on display are usually not out til the next year.  At least, this is the consistent pattern that I have noticed when Bachmann displays products at the NMRA.  

And on a completely different note... The Red Coaches!  



I am so happy that these finally came in the mail today!  Immediately I opened them and put them on the layout and let them go for a run with a few of my engines.  Yes, they are repaints of Annie and Clarabel, but they are still very impressive even with the new roofs that have been added to them.  Yes, the roofs are black like how they have been in the CG era, but with a repaint the problem is fixable if you are bothered.  Personally I'm going to keep mine the way they are, since the models themselves look stunning as they are.  I'm also really happy that this is the only model range to produce these coaches, and that alone is what makes believe that they will be good sellers!



What wins me over the red coaches more than anything else are the details added to the brake coach.  The windows especially get an A in my book, and I really love how these have turned out in the end.



The red coaches might be one of the more simple projects we have seen compared to other products announced in the range, but considering the quality these came in they are easily some of my favorite rolling stock to date.  They seem to make up for some of the more disappointing additions like TT #4 or the ice cream wagon.  If you are either a new collector, or even an older Thomas fan, these are highly recommended by me either way and are an absolute must for Thomas modelers.  

They especially look great behind most of the engines too, as they have in the television show.









As long as engines remember to get coupled up to them of course!  

But overall, despite the delay I can honestly say that the red coaches were worth the purchase and I may consider getting another coach for the train.  Bachmann have once again outdone themselves, and with Oliver and Toad on the way, I don't doubt that we will see more great products from them in the near future. Smiley

Thank you Bachmann!

I take it these pictures are supposed to be of the Red Coaches. Why won't these images display the picture for me? All it displays is a black out line if the image. I am interested in seeing them, as my Red Coaches have not been delivered yet.
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AJW98Productions


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« Reply #62 on: November 01, 2015, 06:09:52 PM »

Does anybody know why Skarleoy's body piece is made of metal and not plastic? I did that a bit odd for a Model Railway Locomotive to be made of metal.

Actually, here in the UK at least, most bodies or running plates are starting to be made of metal - it adds much-needed weight to the models, which helps it grip the track. A model of an engine like Skarloey wouldn't be able to pull anything if it had a plastic-mould body, as it would be too light.

That's true. I haven't noticed any Locomotives in the UK with bodies made of metal. I guess it will be a bit odd first at first when I get my Bachmann Skarloey it having a metal body. It will feel like my childhood days again, with those die-cast metal ERTL Thomas & Friends trains again!

I hope the paint won't be painted on that it could be easily chipped or scratched. That will annoy me a lot.
I actually own an engine made by a UK company (a 4-4-0 tender engine) with a metal boiler, it gives the locomotive a lot of pulling power, probably more than its prototype (proportionally of course), and its traction tyres and 5-pole help with its immense power. I ran it down at an exhibition and it shocked me, as it was able to pull almost as much as my Bachman Gordon. So I'd say the metal body did make a difference...
~Alex
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #63 on: November 01, 2015, 06:20:23 PM »

Does anybody know why Skarleoy's body piece is made of metal and not plastic? I did that a bit odd for a Model Railway Locomotive to be made of metal.

Actually, here in the UK at least, most bodies or running plates are starting to be made of metal - it adds much-needed weight to the models, which helps it grip the track. A model of an engine like Skarloey wouldn't be able to pull anything if it had a plastic-mould body, as it would be too light.

That's true. I haven't noticed any Locomotives in the UK with bodies made of metal. I guess it will be a bit odd first at first when I get my Bachmann Skarloey it having a metal body. It will feel like my childhood days again, with those die-cast metal ERTL Thomas & Friends trains again!

I hope the paint won't be painted on that it could be easily chipped or scratched. That will annoy me a lot.
I actually own an engine made by a UK company (a 4-4-0 tender engine) with a metal boiler, it gives the locomotive a lot of pulling power, probably more than its prototype (proportionally of course), and its traction tyres and 5-pole help with its immense power. I ran it down at an exhibition and it shocked me, as it was able to pull almost as much as my Bachman Gordon. So I'd say the metal body did make a difference...
~Alex


I will take your word for it Alex, but I am not going out looking to buy a Locomotive with a metal body for the sake of it. I will wait until I can get my hands on Skarloey myself when he gets released and when he comes into stock from the website I get my Bachmann Thomas & Friends items from in UK. I have horrible feeling that Skarloey is going to be very expensive looking at the RRP in US Dollars.
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therailwayinspector

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« Reply #64 on: November 02, 2015, 06:28:48 AM »

What has to be remembered is that every model is pretty much put together by hand, and the smaller the detail, the fiddlier the model will be, and so longer will be needed to put it together.

As an example, take a look at this page of a model commissioned by a UK shop. It has a never-ending number of parts and wires, all that need to be put in by hand.
http://www.kernowmodelrailcentre.com/pg/109/Adams-LSWR-O2-Steam-Locomotive-OO-Gauge

I believe that Skarloey is estimated in the region of 90 here in the UK.
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #65 on: November 02, 2015, 08:11:17 AM »

What has to be remembered is that every model is pretty much put together by hand, and the smaller the detail, the fiddlier the model will be, and so longer will be needed to put it together.

As an example, take a look at this page of a model commissioned by a UK shop. It has a never-ending number of parts and wires, all that need to be put in by hand.
http://www.kernowmodelrailcentre.com/pg/109/Adams-LSWR-O2-Steam-Locomotive-OO-Gauge

I believe that Skarloey is estimated in the region of 90 here in the UK.

90 for Siarloey is too expensive for me. That's a rip off, especially how small he will be.
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AJW98Productions


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« Reply #66 on: November 02, 2015, 08:24:20 AM »

What has to be remembered is that every model is pretty much put together by hand, and the smaller the detail, the fiddlier the model will be, and so longer will be needed to put it together.

As an example, take a look at this page of a model commissioned by a UK shop. It has a never-ending number of parts and wires, all that need to be put in by hand.
http://www.kernowmodelrailcentre.com/pg/109/Adams-LSWR-O2-Steam-Locomotive-OO-Gauge

I believe that Skarloey is estimated in the region of 90 here in the UK.

90 for Siarloey is too expensive for me. That's a rip off, especially how small he will be.
It is important to note that many highly detailed N or 009 gauge models (which is what Skarloey will be), sell for prices that are often higher than HO/OO counterparts, this usually due to the fact that N gauge is actually so small it is more costly during production to create toolings than in HO/OO, this is part of the reason why HO/OO is usually the dominant choices for UK, US, Australian and other worldwide buyers, as they tend to be cheaper at a higher detail than N gauge counterparts, and are usually cheaper and take up less room than O gauge counterparts, in the field of model trains it isn't always size that affects cost, I mean Z and TT gauges are often more expensive than HO/OO (again) and are smaller than HO/OO too. What must be remembered about pricing is that companies exist to make profit off of their goods so they can continue to employ their workers and make their goods in the first place. With a die-cast body and the smaller nature of N-gauge, Skarloey would make for a rather expensive production, meaning he will be sold at a higher price to recoup losses and gain profit. I can't honestly claim that I think this is a rip off, all things considered. Expensive, yes. Rip off? No, not to me at least. And the alternative to get a nicely detailed Skarloey railway would be through kit building, which would easily cost much, much more than the RTR model.
Just some thoughts
~Alex
« Last Edit: November 02, 2015, 10:34:12 AM by AJW98Productions » Logged
Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #67 on: November 02, 2015, 12:38:59 PM »

What has to be remembered is that every model is pretty much put together by hand, and the smaller the detail, the fiddlier the model will be, and so longer will be needed to put it together.

As an example, take a look at this page of a model commissioned by a UK shop. It has a never-ending number of parts and wires, all that need to be put in by hand.
http://www.kernowmodelrailcentre.com/pg/109/Adams-LSWR-O2-Steam-Locomotive-OO-Gauge

I believe that Skarloey is estimated in the region of 90 here in the UK.

90 for Siarloey is too expensive for me. That's a rip off, especially how small he will be.
It is important to note that many highly detailed N or 009 gauge models (which is what Skarloey will be), sell for prices that are often higher than HO/OO counterparts, this usually due to the fact that N gauge is actually so small it is more costly during production to create toolings than in HO/OO, this is part of the reason why HO/OO is usually the dominant choices for UK, US, Australian and other worldwide buyers, as they tend to be cheaper at a higher detail than N gauge counterparts, and are usually cheaper and take up less room than O gauge counterparts, in the field of model trains it isn't always size that affects cost, I mean Z and TT gauges are often more expensive than HO/OO (again) and are smaller than HO/OO too. What must be remembered about pricing is that companies exist to make profit off of their goods so they can continue to employ their workers and make their goods in the first place. With a die-cast body and the smaller nature of N-gauge, Skarloey would make for a rather expensive production, meaning he will be sold at a higher price to recoup losses and gain profit. I can't honestly claim that I think this is a rip off, all things considered. Expensive, yes. Rip off? No, not to me at least. And the alternative to get a nicely detailed Skarloey railway would be through kit building, which would easily cost much, much more than the RTR model.
Just some thoughts
~Alex

That is true with the cost of the individual parts involved with the Locomotive, but I still feel 90.00 is still far too step. I could easily go and buy a large Locomotive at around 60.00, so it still too much.
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Cheeky_ULP


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« Reply #68 on: November 02, 2015, 01:03:55 PM »

Size of the locomotive doesn't really determine the price. There's plenty of cheap large scale locomotives close to that price range. The price of an engine is determined by how many resources it takes to make that engine, how many units they've made, and how well they think it will sell. Size has nothing to do with the price of a model trains price; it's the quality.
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #69 on: November 02, 2015, 01:15:25 PM »

Size of the locomotive doesn't really determine the price. There's plenty of cheap large scale locomotives close to that price range. The price of an engine is determined by how many resources it takes to make that engine, how many units they've made, and how well they think it will sell. Size has nothing to do with the price of a model trains price; it's the quality.

I know that is the quality rather than quantity, but as this stage, I think it problably 20.00 - 30.00 too expensive. I might think differently when I finally get it after it's release.
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therailwayinspector

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« Reply #70 on: November 02, 2015, 08:20:29 PM »

Think of it this way:

Look at how small it is. All the parts have to be put on by hand, and the motor etc wired, again by hand. You work in the factory doing this day after day. Because it is so small, it takes longer to put together, as you have less space to fit everything into.

Compare it to N gauge, and it isn't too badly priced; heck, even tank engines here in the UK are creeping up to the 3 Figure price mark.
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Chaz


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« Reply #71 on: November 02, 2015, 08:57:08 PM »

Some of my friends at my club also model in HOn30/OO9, Skarloey himself doesn't seem to be that bad compared to prices for other narrow gauge models in their collections.  His price isn't what I'm worried about in regards to how the Skarloey range will do in sales.  If anything, I think the rolling stock is too expensive since the regular Peco stock is a lot cheaper and even has the extra detail of a brake pipe.  Despite that, I may pick up a couple of the vans to go with Skarloey, but I'm hoping to find them for a cheaper price than what I'm seeing in current shops that offer pre-order. 
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AJW98Productions


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« Reply #72 on: November 03, 2015, 02:35:30 AM »

If anything, I think the rolling stock is too expensive since the regular Peco stock is a lot cheaper and even has the extra detail of a brake pipe.  Despite that, I may pick up a couple of the vans to go with Skarloey, but I'm hoping to find them for a cheaper price than what I'm seeing in current shops that offer pre-order. 
I suspect the prices will drop a little after the first year or so...I hope...but I'm not looking to buy into this range immediately, though in all fairness I think with the massive price difference I would go for the Peco stock...with maybe a few exceptions (I'd like to pick up one of the blue vans, it can form a kind of "luggage van", if BACHMANN decides to release the blue/white coaches seen in the earlier seasons of the show...
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #73 on: November 03, 2015, 03:23:59 AM »

Think of it this way:

Look at how small it is. All the parts have to be put on by hand, and the motor etc wired, again by hand. You work in the factory doing this day after day. Because it is so small, it takes longer to put together, as you have less space to fit everything into.

Compare it to N gauge, and it isn't too badly priced; heck, even tank engines here in the UK are creeping up to the 3 Figure price mark.

How do you it is out together by hand?

I have noticed that.
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Jacob Wilson
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« Reply #74 on: November 03, 2015, 03:25:38 AM »

Some of my friends at my club also model in HOn30/OO9, Skarloey himself doesn't seem to be that bad compared to prices for other narrow gauge models in their collections.  His price isn't what I'm worried about in regards to how the Skarloey range will do in sales.  If anything, I think the rolling stock is too expensive since the regular Peco stock is a lot cheaper and even has the extra detail of a brake pipe.  Despite that, I may pick up a couple of the vans to go with Skarloey, but I'm hoping to find them for a cheaper price than what I'm seeing in current shops that offer pre-order. 

What is the price of the Rolling Stock?
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