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Author Topic: gorre & daphetid layout for ez track.  (Read 11208 times)
rogertra


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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2016, 01:45:38 PM »


..........which is why I suggested adding a length of 1x4 to the original 4x8 table. this plan will fit, just barely, on a 4x8 but adding a few extra inches to the front side will keep the track away from the edge. you really don't need to go 5 foot here.

that said, I have never come across anything but 4x8 sheets, or smaller cut down 4x4 or 4x2 sheets where I live. it was mentioned that ping pong tables are now Masonite, which is completely unsuitable for a baseboard for a model train layout, and much better suited for backdrops.

the way I would construct this layout makes the whole "what size plywood shoulo=d I look for" question a moot point. I piece my subroadbed together from 1x4 pine, it is a lot of cutting and fitting of pieces, but it is strong enough to walk on, and easier to spike to than plywood.

Do you spike directly into the plywood and not into a Donnacona roadbed?

I never lay track directly onto the plywood, not even in hidden staging but always lay a Donnacona roadbed first.  Every magazine article I've ever read says to use a roadbed like Donnacona and advises against laying track directly onto plywood.  Firstly, Donnacona accepts spike better than plywood and secondly Donnacona absorbs noise.

But, of course, everyone is free to build their model railroad as they see fit but I would advise a beginner to use a sheet of Donnacona.


Cheers




Roger T.

 


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jward


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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2016, 06:23:34 PM »

I handlay my track, and since tru scale roadbed is unavailable I lay mine directly on the pine board. it's never given me more than minor problems. plywood is way too hard to spike into with the small spikes I use, and homasote has problems with dimensional stability as well as being too soft to reliably hold the rails in guage.

if tru scale roadbed were still readily available I would use it. I have seen layouts built with it that have lasted over 35 years with no problems.

any other type of roadbed may be suitable for ready made track, but it does not suit my purposes.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Len

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« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2016, 08:50:20 AM »

Jeff - I've gotten some special built frogs from these guys in the past. They appear to still carry a full line of Tru-Scale roadbed:

http://www.troutcreekeng.com/bkho.html

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jward


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« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2016, 10:51:28 AM »

thanks. I had no idea it was still being made.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
rogertra


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« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2016, 12:54:12 PM »

I handlay my track, and since tru scale roadbed is unavailable I lay mine directly on the pine board. it's never given me more than minor problems. plywood is way too hard to spike into , and homasote has problems with dimensional stability as well as being too soft to reliably hold the rails in guage.



Not true.  Homasote is dimensional stable.  More dimensionally stable than the plywood and other wood you use to build your benchwork from.  After all, Homasote is both a sound proofing material and an insulation material designed for use under wallboard and flooring, so it must be stable.   Visit their website.   If it wasn't stable, then why do all the model comics recommend using Homasote for roadbed as do all the leading model railroaders out there?  Not even the leading model railroaders but practically every modeller ever published does.  They ALL, to a man, use Homasote or Homabed.

I hand laid all the track on my now dismantled GER, including building frogs from scratch, and had absolutely zero issues with Homasote.  My ties were glued to the Homasote and it's your ties that hold the rails in gauge and in place, not the Homasote.  I even glue my flex track down and just use push pins to hold it in place overnight as the glue dries.

Homasote is the best material for roadbed use currently available.


Cheers


Roger T.


« Last Edit: March 24, 2016, 01:27:07 AM by rogertra » Logged

AJPiskel

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« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2016, 03:45:30 PM »

I'd like to thank you gentlemen for your responses and ideas.

You have given me a few things to think about and I do appreciate it.

Thanks again, I'll keep you posted if I decide to build a different layout in the future.
AS I am still negotiating the right of way with the Mrs.

Andy
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jward


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« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2016, 04:01:13 PM »

interesting about the homasote......

I thought the published modellers  had mostly moved on to extruded foam a long time ago. I have seen a variety of methods stated as used by modellers in print over the years, including the method I use. not everybody out there is drinking the homasote kool aid. as a matter of fact, you can see for yourself if you are so inclined. build track on homasote, build some on pine, put them in a humid and possibly minimally heated basement and see which one has swelled and warped. see which one has the track kinked at the joints due to expansion and contraction.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
rogertra


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« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2016, 01:33:53 AM »

interesting about the homasote......

I thought the published modellers  had mostly moved on to extruded foam a long time ago. I have seen a variety of methods stated as used by modellers in print over the years, including the method I use. not everybody out there is drinking the homasote kool aid. as a matter of fact, you can see for yourself if you are so inclined. build track on homasote, build some on pine, put them in a humid and possibly minimally heated basement and see which one has swelled and warped. see which one has the track kinked at the joints due to expansion and contraction.


Not on my model railroads.  None of them and there have been several.

As for foam, I'll Never ever use it.  Foam insulation is, by fire code, for use behind wallboard only.  It'd not for use in exposed locations, like on a model railroad and I don't care what the model magazines say about that.  Foam subroadbed, covered on one side with scenery, does not meet fire code.  If that stuff catches fire, the toxic fumes it produces will kill you before the fire department reaches your house if you do not evacuate in time.

Check with your fire department.  Tell them what you are using for and see what they say.  My fire department said "No!"



Cheers.


Roger T.
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Penn1974
Retired railroader


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« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2016, 04:14:12 PM »

Rogertra, I agree that foam board is normally used behind walls. I also have to say that the wood, plastic items and cloth items on our layouts and the carpet in our rooms are just as dangerous in a fire. I think that all of us should have a working smoke dectector with a fresh battery in it in the room and a in date fire extinguisher that is sized for our room.
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rogertra


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« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2016, 06:31:32 PM »

Rogertra, I agree that foam board is normally used behind walls. I also have to say that the wood, plastic items and cloth items on our layouts and the carpet in our rooms are just as dangerous in a fire. I think that all of us should have a working smoke dectector with a fresh battery in it in the room and a in date fire extinguisher that is sized for our room.

The wood, cloth item you mention for use in homes ALL pass the fire code.  All fabrics used in home furnishings are flame retarded.

The wood used in homes is, by it's nature, fire retarded.  In other words, you can put an open flame to it for 30(?) seconds and then withdrawn the flame.  The material should then self extinguish.  Many clothing items, furniture fabrics, draperies, carpeting etc., all have to meet this test.

Try that with foam.

Mentioning materials used in home construction and comparing them to foam is a frequently used red herring.

I work in theatre and movie production and everything we use for sets etc., must be fire retarded.


Cheers


Roger T.
Roger T.
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Penn1974
Retired railroader


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« Reply #25 on: April 01, 2016, 03:09:15 PM »

rogertra , I am not sure where you live but your statement that all the items are fire retardant in my last  post is incorrect. All items will catch fire as I have seen this in 30+ years of firefighting. Anyone who wants to put a flame to cloth , clothing and carpet and wood and think it is fire retardant will be surprised. Draperies, carpet,and rugs will catch fire. I am not saying that foam board will not catch fire but I am saying there are are many different items items that will burn when subjected to a short or flame contact. That is why I said to have a working smoke detectors and a properly size fire extinguisher in your train room.
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rogertra


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« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2016, 11:23:50 AM »

rogertra , I am not sure where you live but your statement that all the items are fire retardant in my last  post is incorrect. All items will catch fire as I have seen this in 30+ years of firefighting. Anyone who wants to put a flame to cloth , clothing and carpet and wood and think it is fire retardant will be surprised. Draperies, carpet,and rugs will catch fire. I am not saying that foam board will not catch fire but I am saying there are are many different items items that will burn when subjected to a short or flame contact. That is why I said to have a working smoke detectors and a properly size fire extinguisher in your train room.



I never said they wouldn't, I said they would pass the flame test which is expose the to a naked flame for 30 seconds(?) withdraw the flame and the item will either not catch fire or will self extinguish.  That's the flame test.  Everything will or melt, including concrete and steel.  Foam doesn't pass the flame test.  Expose foam to a flame and it will catch fire and not extinguish which is why it's so dangerous.

As for your suggestions regrading fire extinguishers and smoke detectors in the hobby room I agree 100% and have both in my hobby room.

Cheers


Roger T.



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