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Author Topic: turnouts  (Read 2137 times)
crash

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« on: September 05, 2016, 07:32:21 PM »

Kind of new at this. What's the difference in the turnouts, #4, #5, #6. I'm building a switching yard and want to put in four or five tracks. Probably about a 18" - 20" wide area.
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ebtnut

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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2016, 09:42:02 AM »

The turnout number refers to the angular spread of the diverging route.  A number 4 turnout opens up 1" for every 4" of run, a number 5 opens up 1" in 5", and so on.  Tight, compact layouts using 18" curves can use No. 4 turnouts to save space.  Larger and longer equipment likes higher numbered turnouts. 
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Trainman203

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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2016, 12:39:07 PM »

The bigger the number, the more realistic things are, the better operation is, and bigger equipment can be used.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
infamouselijah

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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2018, 10:17:57 AM »

Which turnout would go with a 22' radius curve?
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Yardmaster


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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2018, 10:42:28 AM »

This post has everything you want to know about numbered turnouts...

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/t/262912.aspx
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Hunt
?
MBB


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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 12:07:56 PM »

This post has everything you want to know about numbered turnouts...

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/t/262912.aspx

infamouselijah, Did you find answer to your question, "Which turnout would go with a 22' radius curve?"

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infamouselijah

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« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2018, 12:47:26 PM »

Not quite. It has the numbers, but for different kinds of track (at least that's what it seems like to me)
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infamouselijah

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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 12:48:06 PM »

I'm going to guess maybe a #6 though
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Len

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« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2018, 01:04:44 PM »

An alternative would be to use Atlas 22" radius turnouts mounted on cork roadbed. They have Code 83 rails, so transition type rail joiners would be needed, but they would get the job done.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2018, 02:29:50 PM »

This is just using standard turnouts. To give you some idea of width in your planning, this is 17 1/4" wide from the lowest corner of the turnout to the peak edge of the track on top.

This is 7 3/4" wide.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 02:34:05 PM by Terry Toenges » Logged

Feel like a Mogul.
jward


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« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2018, 10:55:40 AM »

Bear in mind that Terry's photos are using the standard 18r switches with a 30 degree angle of turn on the diverging route. That makes the parallel tracks spaced much wider than necessary, they appear to be on about 5 or 6 inch centers. By using #4 or #5 you should be able to tightn up that spacing considerably, even using EZ track you should be able to get the spacing down to 3" or so. Using switches without roadbed, like atlas, shinohara or peco will allow you to space your tracks as close as 2" apart.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Trainman203

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« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2018, 12:43:14 PM »

Ez track is basically train set track, not designed with yard operations in mind.  Iíve got EZ track on parts of my mainline and the first switch at the yard throat is EZ No 5, but the rest of the yard is another brand easier to use in a yard ladder.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
cheerfulchomperofcheese

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« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2018, 10:55:50 PM »

I approach turnout selection at a different angle. what is my longest rolling stock used? (12in (89 foot tofc flat cars), what is my longest prime mover used?(13in (DD40AX centennials). Next group mid length? (8.5in (62 foot high cube box cars), what is my mid length prime mover used?(9in (SD40-2's) Next group short length? (7in (50 foot box cars), what is my short length prime mover used?(7 3/4in (GP40-2). I have a research and development shop and test tracks for testing (what's the point of building a train layout that doesn't work). The test comprises of two 25 foot long runs of track, one 25ft run with R/H and L/H #5 turnouts in yard format and one 25ft run with R/H and L/H #6 turnouts in yard format:

Track: E-Z track nickel silver and #5(3ea) and #6(3ea) E-Z track DCC nickel silver turnouts.

Prime mover: Bachman GP40, SD40-2, DD40AX.

Rolling stock: Accrual 89' flat cars(6ea), Athearn 50' Box cars(6ea), Tyco 62' high cube box cars(6ea).

With the nickel silver E-Z track on the floor and #6 E-Z track DCC nickel silver turnouts:

Longest rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks midrange prototypical.

Longest rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks midrange prototypical.

Mid length rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks prototypical.

Mid length rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks prototypical.

short length rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks prototypical.

short length rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks prototypical.

With the nickel silver E-Z track on the floor and #5 E-Z track DCC nickel silver turnouts:

Longest rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches roughly and strained and cars transition roughly and strained proned to uncoupling and derailing, looks like a platypus on rollerskates.

Longest rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly in to a prototypical tainwreck.

Mid length rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks mid prototypical.

Mid length rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks mid prototypical.

short length rolling stock longest prime mover at slow speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks mid prototypical.

short length rolling stock longest prime mover at high speed,s switches smoothly and cars transition smoothly without any uncoupling or derailing, looks mid prototypical.

Test results for the operational perfomance of the # and #6 turnouts (this includes the test results for the curves being used for this soon to be bult highspeed freight layout)

Main lines uses #6 turnouts with 35.5 and 33 reidus curves incorperating 0.080 super elevated curves, Yards #6 turnouts. why? because the DD40AX and the 89'rolling stock said so, it purs at full speed whith a 70 car pull.

Short lines uses #5 turnouts with 22 reidus curves, Yards #5 turnouts. why? because the SD40-2 and its 62',50', 40' or less rolling stock  said so, it purs.

--End--


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