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Author Topic: HO Steam Loco Types  (Read 1733 times)
JoMc67

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« on: March 18, 2017, 08:20:20 PM »

Hello,

Looking for a typical HO Steam Train that I can connect to my Passenger Box Cars and used in my Victorian Age setup (1870's to 1900...I have a Hawthorne Thomas Kindade Village)...I have no interest in the On30 scale.

I know about the popular early American 4-4-0 (the wide and the narrow funnel stacks) from the 1850's through the ACW that I can still use for the above...
However, what about the popular Modern Baldwin 4-4-0 or ALCO 2-6-0, and when did they come out ?..From what I gather I think these came out alittle later and around the Victorian Age up to early 1900's.

Any info would be appreciated
Thanks, Joe
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Captain Crutch

Historic Vehicle Preservationist


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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2017, 02:27:59 PM »

All 4-4-0s (even Baldwin) was considered obsolete by about 1900. So that's be fine. The 2-6-0s were commonly used from 1860s to the 1920s, so you should be fine.
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Formerly HLC Railroad, but now Iím back and better than ever!
ebtnut

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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 09:56:44 AM »

I would opt for the early Richmond 4-4-0.  The prototypes were built in 1901 with wood cabs and slide valves.  They are typical of the 1890-1905 era.  The Alco Mogul is too modern with its piston valves and Walschearts valve gear.  The "modern" Richmond 4-4-0 (Ma and Pa 6) represents the engine as rebuilt by the railroad in the 1920's, also with piston valves and a steel cab.
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JoMc67

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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 07:39:37 PM »

How about this Train, guys, for the 1870's to 1890's time frame...Early enough ?
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