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Author Topic: Need help to find what lamps (bulbs) to use for adding Connie marker lamps  (Read 3899 times)
DennisT

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« on: December 07, 2007, 11:03:14 PM »

I'm doing my first modifications on my Bachmann, "Connie."  I have moved the headlight up where I want it and have Colorado style marker lamps to install on the smokebox.  The markers are plenty large enough to illuminate with some style of grain-of-wheat lamps.  Can anyone tell me what voltage and style of bulb to order?  I don't know what voltage the headlight is.  I would like to use the headlight power feed to power the markers.  I am also thinking of wiring the markers in series to produce a softer color or glow, then tie them to the headlight feed.  Will the circuitry in the Connie support such an add on?

I don't want to overload a circuit board with excessive power draw.  Tips would sure be appreciated as I'd like to do this right the first time.

Thanks,
Dennis
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2007, 11:36:23 PM »

Why not use an LED rather than a gow lamp?  Longer life, easier to install, and probably simpler.

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
DennisT

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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2007, 01:41:59 AM »

Thanks, Rich.  And I understand the advantages of an LED, however, I'm not sure what to order and from where. 

I suppose the Connie headlight is 12-18V in value, unless it's stepped down by the circuit board.

Dennis
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2007, 12:48:05 PM »

12-18 VAC is a wide swing!!  Try 18 VAC for a DCC electrical system and use anywhere from a 460-ohm to a 1Kohm resistor in series with the marked lead (usually the longer one) of an LED to the decoder, and the other lead directly to the blue lead from the decoder.  As always, do check your work with the manufacturer and/or any standards.

If you use lamps, you will still need a dropping resistor for DCC operations
-unless you like exploding light shows...

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Kevin Strong


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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2007, 01:40:43 PM »

The consolidation's headlight is also an LED. I don't recall how it's wired onto the circuit board, but I'd imagine whatever they're using for that would work for LED marker lamps. I'd look for some off-white LEDs that are being marketed by some of the model railroad mfrs as alternatives for incandescent bulbs. I see them at Caboose, though I don't remember who makes them. I believe they come with the LED and a suitable dropping resistor, but don't quote me.

Later,

K
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Matthew (OV)


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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2007, 06:19:48 PM »

Not to rain on the parade... but many LED's are directional... usually with like a 60 degree viewing angle.  You want something omnidirectional from the side with a marker lamp ... make sure before you buy an LED that all the light doesn't come out the end (and therefore would be going straight up into the top of the lamp!)

Matthew (OV)
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Kevin Strong


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« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2007, 10:11:05 PM »

You can probably scuff the LED to diffuse the light so it shines out the sides. Never tried it myself, but in theory it should work.

Later,

K
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DennisT

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« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2007, 11:37:20 AM »

Thank you.  It's probably worth a try for me, then, to buy a pair of LED's and attempt to get some that will emit light to the side.  These will be for marker lights that only have a front opening, so illuminating 4 sides is not necessary. 

I'd still like to see more comments on what load that might place on the headlight circuit, and any paritular wiring requirements that might be needed other than the obvious hookup.  i.e., perhaps I should NOT wire the LED's in series. 

Dennis
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Fr.Fred

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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2007, 12:34:43 PM »

If you are writing about the small lamps on both sides of the boiler front; THEY ARE NOT "MARKER LAMPS".

   Marker lamps are on the rear of the whole train.

     What you are supposedly speaking of are "CLASSIFICATION LAMPS"

   They would have the option of being;

                                    WHITE lense, to indicate that the loco is leading an EXTRA TRAIN, not on the timetable.
                                   GREEN lense, to indicate that there is a second section of that train, following.
                                   RED lense, to be used when the front of the locomotive is in fact the rear of the train (Not used often, but was sometimes used when a locomotive was running in reverse)

           So, in order to make your "Class"  lights authentic; you should be able to change then from red, to green, to white, or not have them on at all.
       Best to not light them at all, and in most cases you would be more correct.

      "MARKER LIGHTS" are the lights on the rear of the last car on the rear of the train. They usually showed RED to the rear, green showing forward, and to the sides.  Some railroads used YELLOW to the sides and showing towards the front.......

     It was considered that a locomotive, or a locomotive with cars, was NOT a "TRAIN", without "MARKERS" bringing up the rear. A locomotive, running without cars, would be considered a "TRAIN" if it had MARKERS on it's rear.

   Today; on the modern railroads; seldom are Class lights used, and on the rear we see a "Fred" (Flashing rear end detector), which monitors brakline pressure, and on most pikes has a battery operated, flashing amber light.

   Of course these rules were different within the "Yard Limits" in most cases.

   Fr.Fred

   
                                   
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mackers

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« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2007, 09:04:35 PM »

Dennis:   I have done two of my "Connies" and they both came out fine.  I used "Ozark Miniatures" classification (or marker lights) if you like that name better,  for the original installation.   For the bulbs I used grain of wheat bulbs mfg'd by 'Miniatronics Corp". who are based in Deer Park, NY. 11729.    I use either 12 v or 14v bulbs, depending on how bright I want them to be. The part number for the 12v bulbs is:   18-012-10 and the number for the 12v bulbs is:  18-014-10. 

 I've been using these bulbs for years in all the loco's I put the lights on and never had a problem or had one burn out.  The "Ozark" lights are made for large scale and are already drilled for the insertion of the grain of wheat bulb. If you decide to use them, just remember to scrape the paint off the back of the jewels that come with the light (white) for the engine, (red) for the tender.   I just tapped into the headlight wire on the engine and it works fine.........no big deal.    Out here in So. Calif. most large hobby and train stores carry these bulbs so it shouldn't be a hassle finding them, and if there is, I'm sure you could find them on the internet......that's about it, good luck !~!      Mac.  BTW, if  you want to see what they look like, my webb page is:  4LargeScale.com,   then go to my name and click on it, lot's of pic's to keep you busy....!!
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Lee Carlson


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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2007, 12:51:20 PM »

Remember folks,
a Marker is a red (or yellow) light at the rear of a train.
A classification light is a white or green light on the front of a train.
A regularly-scheduled train, with timetable authority does not display
classification lights, but does display markers.
Lee
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Lee Carlson
President,
NYS&W -- Niantic, Yantic, Scantic & Willimantic Traction Co.
DennisT

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« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2007, 03:45:18 AM »

Thanks everyone.  That should do it.  I actually know the difference between the front/rear lamps, I was just asleep when writing. 

 Mackers, thank you for the thoughtful commentary.

Merry Christmas everyone,
Dennis

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r.cprmier

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« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2007, 02:39:15 PM »

Matthew;
Although a diode is in effect, a component of rectification, it can be used as a load, with a resistor in series, which is what happens in a standard decoder.

Now; if you want to get a bi-directional effect out of a LED, just use a ful-wave rectifier, easily made using four diodes, just like in freshman science class.  The load resistor should be pretty much the same value you would nominally seek.  Even a DC power source would work, as the "reverse" of that source would just traverse the other side of the bridge, still completing the circuit via the load LED and resistor.

Rich

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
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