ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 20, 2019, 04:49:06 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  DC on a DCC Layout
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print
Author Topic: DC on a DCC Layout  (Read 4433 times)
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« on: January 10, 2018, 04:01:58 PM »

Iím sure every newbie eventually asks a question about this Ė so I guess itís my turn.  Wink

Iíve been enjoying my Digital Commander set (DCC) for a few months.

I recently purchased an older style (DC) Bachmann PCC trolley which runs just fine. However when not running, the lights remain on and the motor buzzes. Since I donít run it very often, I donít want to leave it in that state whenever the layout is powered, although Iíd like to have it parked somewhere on the layout. Until now, I've been removing it, putting on a separate piece of track close to the layout.

So Iíve got two questions.

1)   Is this behavior ďnormalĒ when running DC equipment on a DCC track?

2)   And if so, is there a way to create a ďcutoffĒ of some sort so that power can be cut to the a stub on which the trolley could sleep?

Thanks.
Logged
dutchbuilder


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 04:13:20 PM »

The answer to both your questions is yes.
What you hear is the block modulation of your dcc controller.
Just make a switchable dead siding for your dc locomotive.
Be aware that running a dc locomotive on dcc is not very healthy for the motor.

Ton
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 06:44:24 AM by dutchbuilder » Logged
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 05:11:47 PM »

Thanks, dutch.

A "switchable dead siding" sounds exactly like what I need. What's involved in creating that? Remember that I'm very new at this.  Smiley
Logged
Terry Toenges


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2018, 07:47:10 PM »

                                 /  /   Straight leg
                                /  /
                               /  /
 TURNOUT -->         /  /____________________________________
                             /  /______                             _______________Diverging leg
                            /  /         V                              V
                           /  /           l__ ++++++++++__l
                                                  on/off switch

You could do it like this. Cut a gap in one leg and wire an on/off switch with one wire on each side of the gap. Fill the gap with a piece of plastic or glue or something so it doesn't close up. Trim it down so it's even with the rails.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 07:53:38 PM by Terry Toenges » Logged

Feel like a Mogul.
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 10:17:07 AM »

I appreciate your diagram and info.

Once again, I'm very new at this. So just to make sure I'm on the right track (yes, pun very much intended), since I'm using EZ Track, where would I put the break? Could I just pull out one of the rail connector pins and replace it with the wire to the on/off switch or would you suggest cutting a rail on the track itself?

Thanks.
Logged
Bucksco

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 12:39:26 PM »

http://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=258_366_367&products_id=2495
Logged
Terry Toenges


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 12:40:33 PM »

Yes. You can remove a rail joiner. They make plastic rail joiners that you could use in place of the metal one. You still have to attach the wire to each side of the gap. You can buy rail joiners with wires attached.  You could use those on the two pieces of track on both sides of the gapped ones. If you want the gap close to the turnout, you can use short pieces of E-Z Track close to the turnout then longer ones past the gap.
Or, you can just cut the gap in the rail and solder the wires on both sides of the gap.
I had forgotten about Bachmann's insulated gap pieces, too. Those would work if you don't want to do it yourself.

            metal joiner        metal joiner                  metal joiner
____________l______________l_________________l_______________
         Joiner with wire       plastic joiner         joiner with wire
____________l_____________  l ________________l_______________
                      V                                                      V
                       l ____________switch_____________l
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 12:48:03 PM by Terry Toenges » Logged

Feel like a Mogul.
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 02:43:06 PM »

Thanks a lot, you guys. Very helpful info.
Logged
Joe323

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 10:26:08 AM »

You might have difficulty removing the metal joiner from the EZ track.  If so I would just do one of two things. 

Clip off the metal joiner and put a tiny piece of plastic in between the roadbed sections to maintain the gap. Or

Cut the gap in the rail somewhere other than a joint with a dremel tool or maybe track cutters.
Logged
jward


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 08:53:24 AM »

I routinely wire my layouts similar to this. Not only does it give you a safe place to park your dc locomotives, it also reduces the load on your command station as well. Dcc locomotives draw power whether you are using them or not, so parking them on isolated tracks will make sure you don't exceed the limits of your dcc system. EZ command is only rated for one amp, and if you have multiple locomotives, especially sound equipped ones, sitting around drawing power you are asking for trouble.

Logged

Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 11:20:18 AM »

Thanks again, you guys.

In educating myself about model railroading, this thread has been a great lesson.  Smiley
Logged
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 10:14:33 PM »

If it's just a "dead end" siding for parking, I would think just using a power routing turnout would save a lot of wiring and a switch......no?

Sid
Logged

James in FL

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2018, 10:55:21 PM »

Quote
If it's just a "dead end" siding for parking, I would think just using a power routing turnout would save a lot of wiring and a switch......no?

Sid

Great minds think alike.
Logged
DAVISinGP

View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2018, 11:02:22 AM »

Looks like my education continues...

I hadn't heard of a "power routing turnout" but by its name, it sure sounds like it might be a solution. Can it be created/used with EZ Track?
Logged
jward


View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2018, 01:40:35 PM »

Power routing may not be a good idea with dcc. On a power routing switch, both points and frog are the same polarity as the rail that one of the points is in contact with. That leaves a situation where the wheel backs may brush a point of opposite polarity, causing a momentary short. This is not noticeable on DC, but on DCC it may instantaneously shut down your command station.

I learned this lesson the hard way when I first started using dcc with my handlaid switches, which were easier to build as power routing types. I had to modify my construction methods to eliminate the problem.

Much better with DCC to use an isolated section with an on-off switch (spst) to kill the power.
Logged

Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!