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September 22, 2018, 05:09:16 PM
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Author Topic: About this layout  (Read 878 times)
mrmel0

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« on: March 12, 2018, 05:11:49 PM »

Brand new. I apologize in advance if my questions are really stupid.

I'm going to start off with something small and simple. I'm looking at this set-up. Please advise if you can, what does it mean by "blocks". I'll have an EZ Command system, exactly what is it that I have to do at those areas marked "G" at the wyes?

Will the Golden Spike ready-to-run N-scale train with DCC command have all the accessories (power) needed to operate this track once the track-pack and extra tracks are added? If not what else will I need?

What is the purpose of having 4 "11.25" radius terminal" at those spots specified?

Any help is much appreciated.

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Trainman203

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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2018, 07:40:10 AM »

Most of your questions are answered on the attached page.  Read again.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2018, 12:15:19 PM »

The picture shows a gap (G) on the lower right between the two terminals (44802). The diagram doesn't show a gap.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 12:19:30 PM by Terry Toenges » Logged

Feel like a Mogul.
bbmiroku

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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2018, 02:54:52 PM »

To answer your questions properly,...

'Blocks' are sections of track electrically isolated from others by gaps in the rails.  If you are running DCC equipment, you don't have to worry about them.  In fact, you won't need to worry about the gaps either, as the trains are controlled by you (DCC) instead of the power supplied to the rails (DC).

The power pack included in your set will have enough power to supply your whole setup, even if operating multiple trains.  But you can always buy another one if you want to be sure.  Just don't add it on to the layout until you've noticed a drop in train performance with multiple units running.

The purpose of having all those terminals is to have a place to hook up separate control packs, if you were using DC, because if not, some sections would go without power once you gap the lines (which you won't need to do with DCC).  You only need the one spot, though.
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mrmel0

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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2018, 05:01:58 PM »

To answer your questions properly,...

'Blocks' are sections of track electrically isolated from others by gaps in the rails.  If you are running DCC equipment, you don't have to worry about them.  In fact, you won't need to worry about the gaps either, as the trains are controlled by you (DCC) instead of the power supplied to the rails (DC).

The power pack included in your set will have enough power to supply your whole setup, even if operating multiple trains.  But you can always buy another one if you want to be sure.  Just don't add it on to the layout until you've noticed a drop in train performance with multiple units running.

The purpose of having all those terminals is to have a place to hook up separate control packs, if you were using DC, because if not, some sections would go without power once you gap the lines (which you won't need to do with DCC).  You only need the one spot, though.

Dude! You explained it to me like I was a 6-year old! I know way more now than I did before your post. Much appreciated!
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bbmiroku

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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2018, 09:58:36 PM »

Glad I could help, citizen.
flies away, making whoosh noises.
woosh ~/o/
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Trainman203

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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2018, 12:09:30 AM »

Whatever all that means.......🤔
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
bbmiroku

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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2018, 12:18:29 AM »

Can you read typewriter?
that is a man in a cape flying away.
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Trainman203

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« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2018, 08:01:33 AM »

Typewriter?  Man .  I remember those !!!!   I had one!  We used them before computers!😱😂. When we called people on phones!  And wrote letters on paper!😱
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Len

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« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2018, 09:30:52 AM »

Even with DCC I'd still use gaps to be able to isolate the two loops for troubleshooting purposes. I'd also add gaps to the spur so I could turn the power off to any loco parked there.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jward


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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2018, 08:25:51 PM »

mrmel, please disregard the part of bbmiroku's post about one pack running multiple trains. You got some bad info there.

The layout as shown is designed for running two trains independently using traditional dc control. To do this, you need two separate power packs, one for each train.  The track is divided into electrically isolated blocks, and enough of them are provided in the plan that you can have two trains running the outer loop at the same time.

On dc, each block can be connected to only one power pack at a time. This is accomplished through the use of electrical switches, which are usually SPDT with a center off position so that power can be killed to any block if necessary. throw the switch one way, and power pack A controls the train, throw it the other way and pack B is in control. Because anything in a particular block is controlled by whichever pack is connected to it, you will want to have only one train in any given block at a time. To run two trains in a given loop, you will need at least three blocks, one for each train and one that is vacant. As your trains move around the layout, train one will move into the vacant block, leaving an empty block behind it. Train two then moves into this block, leaving a vacant block for train one behind it, and so on. As you run the trains, you will be flipping the block switches between pack A and B and vice versa depending on which train is where. It sounds more complicated than it is.

The plan also recommends cutting gaps in both rails to isolate the blocks. This is unnecessary. As long as all gaps are in the same rail (outer or inner, it doesn't matter) you can use the other rail as a common return. This is called common rail wiring, and is greatly simplifies things. The common rail is connected directly to BOTH power packs, the gapped rail is connected to the block switches, one switch per block.

The link below illustrates the common rail wiring better than i can describe it.
http://www.zscalemonster.com/atlas/atl-215.jpg
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 08:32:12 PM by jward » Logged

Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
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MBB


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« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2018, 10:17:24 PM »

mrmel0,
jward's info is helpful in understandings the why of the layout design when used with analog (DC) power, but not information you will use with DCC.  Furthermore, while common rail wiring method can be used with DCC -- do not use common rail wiring with DCC, use home-run wiring.

 
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