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February 19, 2019, 09:32:39 PM
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| | |-+  Banta Silver Bull Saloon. An HO scale build thread.
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Author Topic: Banta Silver Bull Saloon. An HO scale build thread.  (Read 1896 times)
Ken Huck

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« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2018, 07:10:11 PM »

This just keeps getting better and better...

Ken
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2018, 07:42:19 PM »

Thanks Ken. In reviewing the photos, I have spotted a problem area. It may or may not be an easy fix.

I seem to have forgotten to allow the 32nd of an inch clearance that I did for the panels on that side. It's going to make the floorboards look funny when they but up against the door instead of going under it.

Hmmmmmm

Sid
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jonathan


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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2018, 07:12:24 AM »

That is a pickle.  I suppose prying the door away is out as white metal is really soft (will bend).  At the same time, the metal is hard enough that trimming with a knife is difficult.  Also could make a mess of that great-looking trim.

How much adhesive did you use?  Can you cut a hole, from behind the door?  You know, to release the glue. Spitballing.

You might possibly be able to use a wheel, with a motor tool, to trim the bottom of the door, being extra careful around the corner trim.

Of course, from 12 inches away you won't be able to tell (ignore it).  That's probably not an option for you.  I've seen your work... meticulous.

Regards,

Jonathan
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Trainman203

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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2018, 07:53:04 AM »

I had never heard of Banta and checked them out.  Those are beautiful kits and most are sized well for small model railroads.  I really like Clara’s cabinets front.  It’s just what I need to make into a rice mill. And the Oakboro country store too.  I remember wooden buildings like these all around 60 years ago that are all gone now.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Len

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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2018, 08:02:39 AM »

Thanks Ken. In reviewing the photos, I have spotted a problem area. It may or may not be an easy fix.

I seem to have forgotten to allow the 32nd of an inch clearance that I did for the panels on that side. It's going to make the floorboards look funny when they but up against the door instead of going under it.

Hmmmmmm

Sid

You might be able to use the back of a #11 blade to scribe a line across the door just above where the floor boards will hit. This will make it look like the door ends above the floor boards. Especially if you add circular scrape marks to the floor, as if the door dragged when opened.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2018, 03:51:35 PM »

Well, I looked at the area long and hard this morning.......and decided to screw it. lol Grin I'll put a figure in front reaching for the door and take a viewer's eye away from it. After all, it is only a seam barely 7/16" long. Smoke and mirrors, guys, smoke and mirrors. That's what good modelling is all about. It's how well you hide your mistakes.

The upper level of siding is installed, and you can see in the first photo how the detail gets built up by layering 1/32nd inch plywood parts. Again, be careful if you use white glue here, as it will warp the thin wood almost instantly. Apply sparingly or use something like E6000 or Walthers Goo.



This is todays progress. The last of the front fascia is installed as is all it's accompanying trim. Now I have yard work to finish up before it snows again.



More coming........

Sid
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Trainman203

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« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2018, 10:42:51 PM »

Going back and diverging a little bit- Benjamin Franklin was a US founding father who not only invented the lightning rod, he invented the US five dollar bill for a nation so grateful they put his picture on it!  😂😂😂
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2018, 07:35:14 PM »

Going back and diverging a little bit- Benjamin Franklin was a US founding father who not only invented the lightning rod, he invented the US five dollar bill for a nation so grateful they put his picture on it!  😂😂😂

Something doesn't quite ring true about that, but I can't be bothered to Google it.....lol.

Anyhow, on with the show.

Decking!! Individual planks to make up the porch and balcony decks. I had stained these black already, but once they got separated, I saw that the edges were bare. A black Sharpie took care of this quickly and easily. The black edge helps to make the individual boards stand out a bit. Another way to accomplish the accentuated line is to mix a touch of black acrylic paint into your white glue.



And an NWSL Chopper III makes short work of cutting the planks to length. Don't forget to dab each board's end with the marker or you will see the light line against the wall.



Every kit build has it's PITA moment or step. This deck planking was it for the kit. This was three days of tedium beyond delerium Tongue But the end results are usually worth the effort. Use whatever coping method you find best for times like these lololol. 

Cut and fit and cut and fit some more. Work in different spots to help avoid warping anything.



At this point, I was unsure if the decking went under the front doors or not, so I built up the two front entrance doors to check the fit. Turns out, the planks go under the doors as they should. The doors are multi layered, so the two tone thing is easily done. The glazing is held in with a small drop of glue in each corner. The laser cut glazing fits the opening so well, that it is almost a friction fit, but the glue helps ease my OCD.  Grin



Around we go, finally ending with the odd angled pieces and the front sections of the walkways.You can see how the blackened edges help accentuate each board.



The last step is to open up the post holes from bottom to top with a drill bit. The posts that go in are square, so, being that it is hard to put a square peg in a round hole, I use a small square riffler file to reshape the drilled holes.




Then for a laugh, we went and worked on this for my son today. This is a front axle assembly from a 1930 Ford Model AA. We were amazed that with a little heat and some persuasion from a 12 Ton press, it all came apart. The only exception was a bearing that had welded itself to the left spindle. Did I ever mention that I'm into cars almost as much as I am model building?  Cool





Have fun guys......more to come.

Sid

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James in FL

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« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2018, 10:58:50 PM »

That's good stuff Sid!


Looks like the N Scale part of Banta Modelworks was sold to Commercial Scale Models, which seems to be a part of The Building & Structure Co., and Ulrich Model Kits.
Had to go the long way around before I got to where I wanted to go.

Good to see they are still being made.
That Pro Patria Mill kit will be is already on my Christmas wish list.

https://www.ulrichmodelkits.com/store/n-scale/96-pro-patria-mill.html





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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2018, 08:33:02 AM »

Did you notch the floor boards first or just drill through them and then square them away?
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Feel like a Mogul.
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2018, 10:44:09 AM »

Trying to pre-notch the floorboards just makes them split. The holes were drilled then shaped with a small, square file.

Sid
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Len

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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2018, 11:30:46 AM »

I've made square hole punches by shaping and sharpening the end of some K&S square brass tubing to look like these "bigger brother" punches:


You still have to predrill a round hole, but it gives consistently sized and shaped corners without worrying if you're filing off too much.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2018, 08:42:18 PM »

Neat idea Len. Thanks for that.

Today's work involved getting the last of the outer wall panels attached. I decided to give spray adhesive a shot this time, rather then the E6000 or Walthers Goo I usually use.

I was happy with the results. Quick and easy. A light coat, and press together while still almost wet. Don't let it tack too much. This stuff also guarantees no warping.

Be careful here at the corners of the building, as there is a 4 X 4 trim strip to run up the notch that is formed at the point the two panels meet.



The spray adhesive also worked really well for the roof panels. I use airplane silkspan to represent rolled roofing material. Another effective way to attach the strips to the panel is to use Dullcote. Spray the roof and set the strips into the wet Dullcote, then overspray with more Dullcote.

What ever you choose for adhesive, draw a few guidelines first, cut your strips, spray the panel and apply the silkspan.



Then I spent some time pondering the build and adjusting my mood, and decided that this one needed lights. I think a white frosting on the windows and some lights behind will look good. First thing is some quick and effective bulb holders. Drill a couple 1/32nd inch holes in a piece of strip wood and glue it to the wall. The tower just got a couple holes drilled and the wires routed through the walls themselves and tied. I'll get everything mounted and decide how to connect them all and exit the building.





And lastly for today..............a shot of where the magic all happens. This is my modeling bench and work table. Coffee, tunes and my pipe and I am a happy boy.  Grin





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Len

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« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2018, 10:42:53 PM »

Looking good.

I think I may try some of that E6000 on some of the heavier, 1mm - 2mm thick, pieces of my next cardstock project. Just like with wood, sometimes you get warping with white glues, and 'Super Glues' don't give much time for adjustments if needed.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jonathan


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« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2018, 07:12:50 AM »

Man, you have a big magic shop!

Structure looking great.  Getting excited for the big finish.

Regards,

Jonathan
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