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Author Topic: Letter "S" on Crossing Gate Arm  (Read 414 times)
DAVISinGP

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« on: December 13, 2018, 07:56:29 PM »

I've got a set of Bachmann crossing signs and gates (No. 42200).

The letter "S" appears on one side of each gate arm.

I've searched but have not been able to find a reference to it. Does anyone know what that signifies?

Thanks,

Pauley

« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 08:44:45 PM by DAVISinGP » Logged
bbmiroku

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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2018, 11:44:35 PM »

Considering that it doesn't seem like any prototype (at least not one I've seen), it can mean whatever you want.  Maybe Slow or Stop.
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Len

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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2018, 11:43:49 AM »

Your gate is a reproduction of a crossing gate from the days when they were raised and lowered by a gateman using hand cranks. The cranks were connected to the gate by means of ropes and pulleys, later chains, gears, and metal cables. And yes, the 'S' was for 'Stop' back before stop signs were standardized.

The weird shaped pieces near the pivot point are cast iron counterweights. They made it easier for the gatekeeper to raise and lower the gate. The upper and lower circles on both sides had holes through their centers.


 This was so a rod could be run through that stuck out on both sides. Extra weight disks, generally around 30 pounds each, could be added to overcome snow and ice build up.


It would be unusual for the counterweight to be painted white though. And not all of the early gates had the 'S'.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
DAVISinGP

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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2018, 12:28:35 PM »

Great info. Thanks Len.

Seems like bbmiroku made a good guess!  Smiley

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bbmiroku

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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2018, 09:25:32 PM »

Not too many things an S would be used for across a road, so that part was easy.  Didn't know that it really was a prototype though.
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Len

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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2018, 02:20:44 AM »

The rounded top of the pivot pedestal was the giveaway. Compare the model in the O/P with the prototype pics. One thing of interest, the crank mechanism was often located near the gatehouse, not directly on the pedestal like in the second prototype pic. The operating ropes/chains would run through pipes buried in the ground.

I suspect the model was based on something seen at a railroad museum.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
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