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Author Topic: Jonathan's Layout #3  (Read 5165 times)
Len

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« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2019, 06:59:56 AM »

Are you going to add any diagonal bracing for the legs? Or just hope any weight on the tabletop will be light enough not to matter?
(Hint: cross braces are your friends) Wink

From reply #10, "I'll add diagonal supports with the leftover lumber after the main sections are done."

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jonathan


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« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2019, 04:04:59 PM »

 Grin Yep. I've started the diagonals already:

DSC_1534 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Need to do some more, but you get the idea...

DSC_1535 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

For the backdrop; I saw a video once where the modeller took a tray of white paint and added some drops of dark blue, right into the tray, without mixing.  He then used a roller to spread the paint and got a reasonable sky effect. So I tried it.  Not bad:

DSC_1536 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_1537 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

That's about all I have time for this weekend.  I need to continue with track planning before I lay hands on the layout again.  Thanks for reading.

Regards,

Jonathan


Addendum:

Meant to show my homemade compass.  Using a yardstick and a 1/2" dowel, I was able to scribe a 32" radius curve.  This is my mainline. Should be able to run just about any model there is on that radius.  Cheers

DSC_1540 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_1539 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr
« Last Edit: October 05, 2019, 07:24:27 PM by jonathan » Logged
jonathan


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« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2019, 04:30:35 PM »

Woohoo!

Let the fun begin!

Regards,

Jonathan

DSC_1541 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr
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dutchbuilder


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« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2019, 05:54:42 PM »

nice, are you using flex track?

Ton
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jonathan


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« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2019, 06:15:25 PM »

Thanks, Ton.  Yes, flex track for the mainline.  I may use sectional track for the upper level. 

Regards,

Jonathan
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jonathan


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« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2019, 02:26:03 PM »

This week, I pulled out some boxes to begin some of the electrical work and planning industry placement.

I didn't snap a pic of it, but I've run the bus feeds for the mainline, using all  the wire I saved from the last layout.

Also, I placed some flex track around the mainline--not installed yet--just to get a feel for how much track I need to acquire; turnouts, more flex track,... etc.

Made a temporary control area with my power packs--this could be permanent with a little fancy work.

Finally, added some more lighting, though not quite bright enough yet. 

Regards,

Jonathan

DSC_1543 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_1544 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_1545 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr
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Trainman203

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« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2019, 09:31:31 PM »

All this work is in 2 weeks time?  Man. 💥🌪🚀🚀👏🏻👏🏻😎
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
jonathan


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« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2019, 05:21:23 AM »

A little track-laying refresher, in case there are new folks joining us...

For flex track on a curve, I leave the new piece of track straight, while I solder, then bend to the curve:

DSC_1549 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

I used a toothpick and put a liberal amount of flux in the track joiner before I joined the track pieces... And used a couple of heat sinks to reduce rail tie melting:

DSC_1548 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

I used plenty of solder and held the iron to the joint for a few extra seconds, to make sure the solder creeps down deep, for a good bond.  Plus, I intend to attach a feeder wire here, so some extra solder is helpful:

DSC_1550 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Now I can tack down the track and add leftover ties for good looks.  It looks off-center because it is off-center.  I put the inside curve a bit inside the center line on the roadbed.  The outside loop goes a bit to the outside of the center line:

DSC_1552 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Finally, a cut off wheel makes quick work of excess rail.  I have used track cutters and razor saws as well.  They work great, too:

DSC_1551 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Ready for the next piece!

Regards,

Jonathan
« Last Edit: October 18, 2019, 05:25:22 AM by jonathan » Logged
Len

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« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2019, 01:58:28 PM »

And for the beginners, you want to use a soldering iron that gets hot enough to pass the heat to the joint, and solder, quickly. So you can get off the joint before the ties start melting. Some folks use a soldering gun for this, but personally I prefer something lighter to handle. I've used a Weller 1040a soldering iron, with a 45 watt heating element and chisel tip for this type of work for years.
https://www.weller-tools.com/consumer/USA/us/Weller+Consumer/Soldering+Irons/Stained+Glass+%26+Hobby+Applications/1140A

The heating element can be unscrewed from the handle if it needs replacement, and a variety of tips are available to use on the heating element. I find the chisel tip best for this type of track work. Applying some powdered graphite to the tip and heating element threads helps keep them from siezing due to the heat. It's a popular iron among people who do 'lead strip caning' of stained glass, and can be found on many stained glass supply web sites, It may also be availabe on Amazon.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jonathan


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« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2019, 02:22:50 PM »

Update:

I've wired the mainline and run a couple locos almost all the way round (no turnouts yet).

DSC_1560 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Also, the second tier is under construction.  I'll have to remove the 4X8 module when it's time to add switch machines.  Planning for that:

DSC_1559 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

And getting a better feel for placement of industries and roads:

DSC_1553 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

That "ramp" will actually be a gentle 2% grade to get from the branch to the mainline.

Regards,

Jonathan
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2019, 08:32:01 PM »

I like the two tier idea. The elevated mine and tunnels will be nice features to work with.

Go man go!

Sid
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jonathan


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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2019, 03:10:02 AM »

Thanks Sid!

Im actually pondering a third tier. It would involve bridges and viaducts going around a mountain on the other side of the layout. Might make the layout a spaghetti bowl. The other plan is a turntable and round house like my last layout.

Well see which side of my brain wins.  Smiley

Regards,

Jonathan
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Joe323

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« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2019, 07:39:26 AM »

Jonathan I agree with your tips about the soldering iron.  I learned the hard way that a cheap 25 watt iron is not sufficient for trackwork.  I use a Weller  45 watt as well.
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2019, 11:02:39 AM »

I like the third tier idea. I like bridges and viaducts. Your second level mine is cool.
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Feel like a Mogul.
bbmiroku

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« Reply #29 on: October 23, 2019, 09:54:17 PM »

If you raise the third tier enough, you may be able to use N-scale things to 'fool the eye' even more.
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