ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 26, 2020, 03:37:45 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  HO
| | |-+  Jonathan's Layout #3
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 14 Print
Author Topic: Jonathan's Layout #3  (Read 18652 times)
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2019, 10:56:36 PM »

Making progress on my trestle bridge/viaduct.

I have to build it in two 3-foot sections.  The bare bones are done.  Just showing a little progress.  Got a ways to go.

I chose a "weathered gray" wood stain for the bridge. It did NOT turn out the way I hoped.  Maybe some serious weathering will get it closer to what i had in mind.  Anyway, you can see I'm using a lot of rubber bands for clamps:

DSC_0140 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Regards,

Jonathan
Logged
Ken Huck

View Profile
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2019, 11:16:26 PM »

That is coming along really fine.  I wish I'd have thought about rubber bands, could've save me some
headaches.  I'm looking forward to seeing the "void" this thing is going to fill.

Keep it comin',

Ken
Logged
Terry Toenges


View Profile
« Reply #47 on: November 10, 2019, 12:47:02 AM »

It does look good so far.
Logged

Feel like a Mogul.
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #48 on: November 10, 2019, 09:56:46 AM »

Thanks, Gents.

You know your project is getting too big, if you have a tough time shooting a photo that fits.  I didn't realize I was recreating the Bridge Over the River Kwai  Smiley :

DSC_0142_01 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_0145_01 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Building two more bents, and will add a little more cross-bracing. Otherwise, it's starting to look more complete.

Regards,

Jonathan
Logged
Len

View Profile
« Reply #49 on: November 10, 2019, 01:26:09 PM »

Actually, that grey color looks pretty good for weathered wood that hasn't been treated with creosote.

Len
Logged

If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #50 on: November 11, 2019, 07:33:57 AM »

Thank you, Len. Much appreciated.  I was thinking about creosote when planning this project.  Perhaps there's a greenish weathering powder that will give me that hint of weathered creosote. 

OK. project done for now... These are a last few shots of the bridge. You will have to imagine a mountainous area behind the bridge, instead of the big hole in the benchwork:

DSC_0146_01 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

After studying all the wooden trestles, both models and prototypes, I was most impressed with the ones that stayed simple, for lack of a better word.  I wanted a bridge that was sturdy, but did not interfere with the scenery that would sit behind the bridge:

DSC_0148_02 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Hence, my bridge doesn't follow a specific plan. I borrowed from many examples and used the elements I liked, such as the round vertical struts, minimal cross bracing, and the like: 

DSC_0151 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Now on to laying more track.  Probably won't have much to share for a while.  But I'll do some show-and-tell when I reach something interesting.

Regards,

Jonathan
Logged
J3a-614

View Profile
« Reply #51 on: November 11, 2019, 11:45:09 AM »

WOW!!  That thing is a monster!!  Real delicate looking, too--don't send an EM1 or Big Six over it!  Their Cooper ratings are way too high!

Where is it going to go on the layout?
Logged
Trainman203

View Profile
« Reply #52 on: November 11, 2019, 12:04:41 PM »

That beautiful thing looks too big for the layout.  Timber trestles that size largely date from early railroading, I thought.  There were a few back home on the T&NO in the 60s but they were 4 or 5 bents long and maybe 30 high, much smaller.
Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Trainman203

View Profile
« Reply #53 on: November 11, 2019, 12:17:39 PM »

Has a civil engineer friend ever checked that trestle? 🤔😱😂😂
Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
dutchbuilder


View Profile
« Reply #54 on: November 11, 2019, 04:31:32 PM »

As Bob Ross used to say;"It's your world and somewhere there lives a happy tree".
That sad it's more a threstle with a layout than the other way arround.
In my humble opinion, your layout is to small.
Nice trestle by the way.

Ton

 
Logged
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #55 on: November 11, 2019, 06:55:43 PM »

 Grin

OK I get it.  bridge is 70 feet high and 500 feet long. scaled up.  I'll make it work.  I kinda like it now... especially after all that work.

Thanks guys!

Cheers!

Regards,

Jonathan
Logged
Irbricksceo


View Profile
« Reply #56 on: November 11, 2019, 08:51:38 PM »

Grin

OK I get it.  bridge is 70 feet high and 500 feet long. scaled up.  I'll make it work.  I kinda like it now... especially after all that work.

Thanks guys!

Cheers!

Regards,

Jonathan

I like it, I think it looks good, you find a place for that thing!
Logged
Ken Clark

View Profile
« Reply #57 on: November 11, 2019, 11:40:11 PM »


  Jonathan

  Very impressive build.

   Remind's me of the trestle which allowed access to the plant that I worked at. length and height would be close to your
model, basic difference was that the trestle was curved crossing the valley.

  Ken Clark
   GWN
Logged
jonathan


View Profile
« Reply #58 on: November 16, 2019, 03:19:18 PM »

One of the problems with the 3rd-tier build is that I have to lay track so high off the bench work.  Everything has to be fairly smooth and sturdy--even though it's 9.5" off the deck.

I have a 6-foot expanse that will need three bridges, while staying straight and level.

DSC_0156_01 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

My idea is to use some thread, strung across the expanse, at track-tie height.  I can follow the thread across, while I build up sub-roadbed, piers, and the like:

DSC_0154 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

I pounded in a couple of track nails on either side of my expanse.  Then attached some thread from an old sewing kit. Who needs day-glow green anyway?  One thread-end is tied, while the other end is wrapped and weighted, so I can move it as needed.

DSC_0153 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

DSC_0152_01 by Jon Vogel, on Flickr

Hopefully, this will work, while I build across the layout.  Most of this will be hidden by hilly terrain, but it still needs to be done well for the trains to run smoothly.

Regards,

Jonathan
« Last Edit: November 16, 2019, 03:21:32 PM by jonathan » Logged
Ken Huck

View Profile
« Reply #59 on: November 16, 2019, 06:25:16 PM »

It's really coming together in a way I couldn't imagine.  Sewing thread is another good idea.  I spend a lot of time
back and forth measuring wasting a lot of time.  Can't wait to see the finished track plan once it's all laid.

Keep the pictures coming...

Ken
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 14 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!