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Author Topic: Good Grammar (gud grammer) for users  (Read 5157 times)
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2008, 01:03:11 PM »

Rich - Not sure what King Ralph is.
I have a fellow Marine buddy whose dad was stationed in England during WWII where he met and married a British lass and brought her to the States.
She often comes up with phrases like that just to see the reactions of us American folks.
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Feel like a Mogul.
Woody Elmore

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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2008, 01:42:36 PM »

I think the comment about two countries separated by a common langauge was first uttered by George Bernard Shaw although it sounds like something Mark Twain could have said.

A friend of Scottish ancestory returned to Scotland to visit his dad's home. He said he nearly didn't survive eating haggis but at least was consoled by a liberal application of single malt Scots whisky.

I tried (operative word is tried) steak and kidney pie once in London. Maybe it was the restaurant but I couldn't deal with it.

In Astoria, queens, home to many immigrants, there is an Egyptian restaurant whose specialty is  braised lamb's hearts! No Thank You.

Changing the topic, there is a nice spread in RMC magazine about the British locomotive museum in York. I've been there, it's definitely worth the trip (by train, of course!)
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ebtnut

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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2008, 03:34:30 PM »

When I was in the UK, I was verbally slapped on the knuckles regarding the folks north of Hadrian's Wall.  The folks who live there are Scottish.  They do, however, distill the finest kind of whiskey, which is Scotch.
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Woody Elmore

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« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2008, 09:13:09 AM »

A Scottish bartender I knew in my misspent youth adamently referred to Scotch whisky as Scot's whisky. The semantics are minor, the whisky, by any name, is, water of life!

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r.cprmier

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« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2008, 10:49:04 AM »

Woody;
Check out the literature on a bottle of Scots Whiskey-I think you will find that most labels call it "Scots", and not "Scotch", which is more of a Yankee abomination than anything else.

Caber tossing, anyone?

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
grumpy

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« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2008, 05:25:00 PM »

Terry
We used to call the ex premier of our province King Ralph.
Don
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2008, 05:07:08 PM »

King Ralph" is the name of a movie that starred  Peter O'Toole, the guy who played Roseann's husband (? Goodman).  The context of the story is that the aids to the king (Peter O'Toole) were to find the king's twin lookalike for him to be used as a decoy so the real king would be safe.  Parts of it were funny, but the movie was, to me, a bit of a drag-perhaps might hold the fascination of a cocker spaniel.
The women were pretty good looking, though!  Ahh to be the king...
..or, as the say:  Once a king, always a king, but once a knight's...

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Woody Elmore

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« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2008, 05:43:18 PM »

Sorry! no scotch or Scot's whisky in this house. I prefer Irish whisky - Tullamore Dew - to be precise. It was once made in County Offaly and that is why it's "offaly" good.
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