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Author Topic: Name That Locomotive Game  (Read 185399 times)
TonyD

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« Reply #690 on: February 13, 2008, 09:42:22 AM »

I still say it could be a Peckett, could be from c.1910, the rest is painted on the side.... seems no one else is guessing different, soooo....
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StanierJack
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« Reply #691 on: February 13, 2008, 11:20:09 AM »

I still say it could be a Peckett, could be from c.1910, the rest is painted on the side.... seems no one else is guessing different, soooo....

Close enough. It's a Avonside. 1921 design built in 1923.

Flicking through my archives resulted in this beauty:



Painted in full Midland Railway Crimson red.

Loco builder and date is what to find.
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TonyD

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« Reply #692 on: February 13, 2008, 01:33:35 PM »

Easy. Baldwin 1900...or was the strike in '99?? I forgot, was just a kid then....off fighting the boers....
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Guilford Guy


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« Reply #693 on: February 13, 2008, 04:29:58 PM »

Mr Livingstone I presume?
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Alex

TonyD

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« Reply #694 on: February 13, 2008, 04:49:40 PM »

Doctor. He was a doctor of medicine from Scotland. Stanley aproach him and said " Doctor Livingstone, I presume?" The Doctor said "yes, thank God you've found me". Somewhere I have a picture of that event.....didn't have digital back then.....
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Santa Fe buff

N&W


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« Reply #695 on: February 13, 2008, 07:40:28 PM »

All I can give is 1880s-1900 British steam loco, sorry- I got nothing on the loco.
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StanierJack
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« Reply #696 on: February 14, 2008, 03:14:06 AM »

All I can give is 1880s-1900 British steam loco, sorry- I got nothing on the loco.

I'll let the regulars post stuff back up now. It's not British, but a Baldwin & Schenetiy. (Did I spell that right?) IT is from 1909.
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TonyD

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« Reply #697 on: February 14, 2008, 01:28:20 PM »

This photogragh is a Baldwin, the boiler and domes attest to that. This basic pattern is what MDC/roundhouse is based on. Schen. had a tapered boiler and flatter turret by....my rosters say 1899-1900. Isn't that the year British makers were on strike?
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StanierJack
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« Reply #698 on: February 14, 2008, 01:31:39 PM »

This photogragh is a Baldwin, the boiler and domes attest to that. This basic pattern is what MDC/roundhouse is based on. Schen. had a tapered boiler and flatter turret by....my rosters say 1899-1900. Isn't that the year British makers were on strike?

Not quite sure, I only really know the 1950's / 60's. The days when British Main Line steam was at an end.
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Dr EMD

Founded 1922 as Electro-Motive Engineering Company


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« Reply #699 on: February 14, 2008, 06:20:57 PM »

The American 2-6-0 tender engines were erected at Derby in 1899 and were supplied by Burnham Williams and Co., namely Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia and by the Schenectady Locomotive Works, New York. Recourse was made to America as the Derby shops were full to capacity with work, and the private locomotive builders were in the midst of a boom and suffering from strikes. As more six-coupled locomotives were needed Johnson, in company with his opposite numbers on the Great Central and Great Northern Railways, obtained sanction to purchase from the USA and orders for thirty locomotives were placed with Baldwin and ten with Schenectady.

Within a few weeks the first crates arrived at the Derby Works on 24 May 1899, the engines having been previously assembled and then dismantled again at the parent companies works. Space was found at the bottom end of No 3 bay in No 8 shop at Derby for the re-erection of the Schenectady locomotives, but the Baldwin's exceeded the capacity of the shops and space was cleared in front of the Locomotive Works offices and they were erected out in the open, this fortunately being summer time.

The first Baldwin was ready to go into service by the end of May, the range of running numbers allocated to this type being 2501-10 and 2521-40, and the first ten locomotives were completed by the end of the following month. These engines were almost entirely American save the Johnson coal-rails and MR buffing and drawgear. They had the normal (for the USA) bar frames and outside cylinders (18in x 24in) with inside valve gear. The driving wheels were 5ft diameter on a wheelbase of 6ft 3in + 8ft 6in and the pony truck wheels were 2ft 9in diameter, being 7ft 5in in front of the leading driving wheel. The boiler was pressed to 160psi and had three "domes" of varying sizes, one being a sand box on the first ring of the boiler, the next the steam dome housing the regulator and twin "Coale" pop safety valves and the last and smallest one housing chime whistle and spring safety valve. The cabs were very large by Midland standards with two side windows. One unusual feature was the bar steel support struts from the smokebox to the footplating over the pony truck. The last 20 Baldwin were built between September and November, 1899 and the class was divided between the Toton, Sheffield and Leeds running depots. A driver of that day, James Gibbs Hardy, observed "very rough workmanship" when the crates of material arrived, but modified his criticism when the first commenced running on 21 June commented in his diary "splendid weather cab, upholstered seats and the engine looks considerably better now it is in working order". He had one of these engines No 2503, booked to him to do 1000 miles and found them hard to reverse and rather poor steamers. He took the first one to Normanton where everyone stared at it, and on 24 July took the first one up the Peak to Manchester, recording that she went up the bank with 80-901b of steam. By August 8, he had completed his 1000 miles and was "very glad to get rid of her" .

The Schenectady were rather nearer to looking like Midland engines, although they also had bar frames. The outside cylinders were 18in x 24 in and the tapered boiler was pitched 7ft lin from rail, the working pressure being 160psi. Driving wheels were 5ft diameter on a 7ft + 8ft 6in wheelbase and the pony truck, having 3ft diameter wheels was placed 7ft 6in in front of the leading driving wheel. Total wheelbase was 43ft and length over buffers 51ft 11¼in with basically Midland 3,250gal tender on a shorter 12ft 3in wheelbase. Working weights were engine 49.75 tons and tender 37 tons. These were all stationed at Wellingborough.

As can be gathered from Hardy's comments these engines were not popular and some criticisms reached America causing bad feeling. Johnson gave some comparable figures quoting that, work for work, they consumed 20-25% more coal, and 50% more oil than his standard goods engines, while repairs cost 60% more. To their credit he observed that the engines cost £400 less than their British counterparts, and were at least supplied within a few months of the contract being placed, while he had to wait about three years for locomotives ordered from British firms, due in the main to the engineering strike which had forced the Midland Company to buy "Yankee" in the first place.

Supervising the contract for the Baldwin engines being built in America for the Midland was J.W. Smith, who was on January 1, 1901 to become the Chief Locomotive Draughtsman in place of T.G. Iveson.
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TonyD

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« Reply #700 on: February 14, 2008, 11:52:02 PM »

Whoa! I'm impressed! Did you type all that? Not from memory I hope.... Well Stanier Jack, guess I was right, but give the cigar to Dr. EMD....I know they didn't last as long as the average UK steamer either.... oh well.
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don't be a tourist, be a traveler. don't be a forumite, be a modeler
Dr EMD

Founded 1922 as Electro-Motive Engineering Company


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« Reply #701 on: February 15, 2008, 03:49:25 PM »

Tony
It was a cut and paste job.

Doing research on the Internet for my dissertation is better than hanging around in a library any old day. But I miss checking out the lasses at the schools. Smiley

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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #702 on: February 17, 2008, 11:21:31 PM »

Okay, here's a new challenge:



You need to know who made it, how old it is, and where it is when this photo was taken (1997)
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RAM

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« Reply #703 on: February 18, 2008, 12:01:27 AM »

alco 1890 cuba
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Beatle (TrainBrain)

Neil Aspinall: 1941-2008.


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« Reply #704 on: February 18, 2008, 06:44:11 PM »

Location: Shantytown?
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