ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 06, 2020, 10:16:07 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  I beam color on '50s bridges
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: I beam color on '50s bridges  (Read 4105 times)
SteamGene

View Profile
« on: February 10, 2008, 06:51:36 PM »

I'm building two steel girder, concrete pillar highway bridges made by Rix.  The concrete parts are actually a good color and I may just dullcote them.  The I beams and the railings are an almost Kelly green.  I'm modeling, as many of you remember, Sep-Oct, 1957.  i've already looked at local I-beams.  So you older guys or younger guys who study bridge history, what would be the appropriate color for:
1.  The I-beams
2.  The wrought iron railing
I'm thinking that the red brown spray paint primer may be justwhat I want for the I-beams and perhaps weathered or engine black for the railing. 
Thoughts?
Gene

Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Dusten Barefoot

Determind to get some E.T.&.W.N.C On30 models


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2008, 08:04:17 PM »

On the ET&WNC, the I beams on the bridges were silver.
Logged

I know I pester the hell out of everone over a 4-6-0
E.T.&.W.N.C, TWEETSIE, LINVILLE.
www.tweetsierailroad.com
http://www.johnsonsdepot.com/crumley/tour1.htm
#12 and 10-Wheelers
Black River & Southern
Rock On & Live Strong
Dusten
Tim

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2008, 10:04:04 PM »

Gene

The bridge belongs to the railroad, and they are responsible
for it's maintenance and or neglect.  The railroad would also have
chosen the color's used.

So Gene make anything you want it will be correct.

Tim Anders
Souderton, PA
Logged
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2008, 10:39:39 PM »

Tim,
Highway bridges.  One over Mickie's Run, the other over VT&P tracks.  The railroad built neither and is responsible for neither. VT&P bridges are black. 
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
#94

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2008, 10:45:16 PM »

 I would dullcoat the Concrete and the green I-beams. The railings could be steel or iron and if you like the green you could just dulcoat them also. If this were a Michigan highway bridge of about this timeframe the railings were steel with a very heavy galvanized dipped (not shiny) finish.
Logged
grumpy

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2008, 11:02:56 PM »

I was working for a co. named Dominion Bridge during your time period.Whatever could fit in the tank was cleaned and galvanized. The bigger pieces were wheelabrated and coated with red zinc primer. Some of the larger pieces were left to rust with the rust providing the protective coating. As mr. Bachman would say -Have fun. Huh?
Don
Logged
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 11:13:23 PM »

Sounds like my first idea is about right - zinc oxide/boxcar red/red primar for the I beams and some dull black for the handrails. 
Thanks.
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
grumpy

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2008, 11:49:50 PM »

Gene
During  that era there were some bridges still assembled by riveting especially railroad bridges. The railways were very slow to make changes.It might be a good idea for authenticity to build some riveted bridges.
Don. Smiley
Logged
RAM

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2008, 12:08:00 AM »

steel girder highway bridges were painted silver.
Logged
TonyD

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2008, 11:51:39 AM »

I would say, peasant in the modeling world that I am, Ram has a point, when co's that look after stuff like that used silver aluminum in that time, and it is sill holding up. RR's that used black, are now all rusty. Personally, don't paint anthing 'till the scene comes together, a quiet sleepy villge with a glossy silver overpass might not fit in the scheme of things, or a dull area that needs some attention doesn't need a rusty camo one. That silver arch span I send you was 'cause the rest of the harbor is so dark and dull back there, the trestle was weathered dark, now I'm content 'cause the grass is so light. I realize you have stretching and overspray issues, but try to put if off, and then, do like a girl in a shoe store, till it all fits in and looks right....
Logged

don't be a tourist, be a traveler. don't be a forumite, be a modeler
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2008, 01:12:49 PM »

I'm afraid the girders will have to be sprayed before assembly as they are on the bottom of the bridges.  The scene is out in the country.  To the right are nothing but the hilss of the Blue Ridge.  To the left is a meat packing plant.  A Virginia highway runs under the track from Hannahville going towards Leesboro and then over Mickie's run before turning again and crossing track linking Sugar Grove, WV (staging) with Hannahville.
I think I may be safe with either the red oxide or silver. 
Thanks.
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
ebtnut

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2008, 03:04:02 PM »

You can probably choose almost any color for those girders.  Many bridges around here (MD) had the girders painted a green that is very close in color to NYC Jade Green.  Others, especially those built using Cor-ten steel, were left unpainted.  Cor-ten steel rusts in a way that the rust coating actually becomes protective like paint.  It weathers to a dark brown color, pretty much like Rail Brown.  Red lead paint was another option.  Railings were generally painted black, or left in unpainted galvanized finish, which weathers to grey over time. 
Logged
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2008, 03:46:34 PM »

Thanks, Nut.
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
CHUG

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2008, 09:23:19 PM »

Your steel girders on highway bridges probably have different coatings as you go west in Virginia in that era you see. Rumor had it in the late 50s the railroad and government cooked up a secret to build a nuclear molecule proofed hideout for the washington suits under a hotel like the cave under wayne manner and so forth for when the commies shot nuclear bombs at us. I talked with a guy once whos sister lived by there and saw it being built and when you asked what there building alls theyd say is there building a male clinic. Id figure if they built a hideout there theyd also use girders on the roads the suits take to get there that can hold up getting hit with nuclear molecules without falling down you see so id expect nuclear molecule proofed coatings on the girders from the 50s as you get further west. This stuff can range in colors. Thanks.
Logged
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2008, 10:12:47 PM »

Chug,
About 90% of your post is exhaust steam. However, in the '50s the government constructed a massive nuclear attack refuge under the Greenbriar in West Virginia.  My father, for a time, was one of the helicopter pilots tasked with ferrying government officials from Washington, DC to the Greenbriar.  At the time I didn't know this as the mission was TOP SECRET and he didn't spill beans about such as that.  Many years later he mentioned part of it and the COHS detailed the destination's details a couple of years ago. 
Again, for those of us who know and have worked with nucs, your messages are something to laugh at.  You have no clue.
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!