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Author Topic: common rail  (Read 3264 times)
SteamGene

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« on: February 20, 2008, 09:21:17 AM »

I'm blocking my engine ready tracks so I don't put power to all the locomotives at once.  For you electricians in the group - does it make any difference which rail I make the common rail? 
I've used insulators on both rails for the power districts, but I figure using common rail I only have to put one d - - - insulating joint per power section. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
THB-DAVE

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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2008, 09:35:29 AM »

Hi Gene: It does not matter what rail you make the common rail as long as your consistent. For a circle layout it can be the inner rail or for a linear layout it can be the north rail.

Dave
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Tim

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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2008, 09:35:56 AM »

Gene

You can use either rail, just make sure that all sidings are using
the same rail and are connected to the same side of the buss.

This will prevent unplesant suprizes down the road.

Tim Anders
Souderton, PA
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SteamGene

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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2008, 10:32:03 AM »

I know about consistency.  Rail wires are red and black.  the ground to the DCC is green.  What I will do for AC, I'm not sure yet - maybe blue and white.  I don't need to worry about frogs.   All the rail I'm worried about forms stub end sidingsl 
Thanks.
Gene
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Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Atlantic Central

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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2008, 11:38:33 AM »

Common rail was considered state of the art for a long time. New thinking has finaly changed that. Even on my DC layouts I have never liked common rail wiring. And with my new system using the Train Engineer it will not work.

BUT, for what you are doing it should not cause any problems, and as others have stated just be consistant.

One of my big objections to common rail is that I use metal wheels and metal trucks, so I do not want a pair of wheel sets in one truck to be able to bridge the only isolated rail and cause problems. this does not happen when both rails are gapped.

Sheldon
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SteamGene

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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2008, 12:06:00 PM »

The area where I'm thinking of using common rail is the engine ready track area in staging.  No car will be on it.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2008, 09:53:07 PM »

Common rail wiring in a yard that is all part of a single DCC district or sub district is okay.  Common rail across districts or sub districts is a no-no.  Common rail used throughout a large district can occasionally cause problems.   In your application, common rail in a limited area all in one district (or sub district) is a good way to go.
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
SteamGene

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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2008, 10:17:09 PM »

Thanks, Jim. 
I'm working on about six or seven projects while waiting until we can do the engine facility and finish the mainline track.  In the meantime I'm doing engine storage, beginning scenery, and testing.
Gene
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Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
r.cprmier

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« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 07:17:09 PM »

Gene;
For my money-and I am an electrician-I would use a DP type switch, and that way you are going to know for sure that the track has no power to it.  oe that it does.  No guesswork.  I thought the Army taught you stuff like that!  The Air Force did!  B-52s are an expensive aminal!

Former CommanderSam Deeley, Skipper of the submarine, USS Barb, once commented that "nothing is foolproof".  I am a staunch proponent of that thought; so say what you might, I would use a fully isolated track and call it a day.  How much more work is it-really?
Rich
PS:  Your layout seems to ba galloping along there; I guess you must be REEEEE-TIRED!!!  I am still greedy...
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
SteamGene

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« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2008, 10:36:13 PM »

Rich,
Artillerists are taught one thing about electricity.  Keep it away from separate loading powder and away from semi-fixed when the projo is not in the canister.  And ground your generators.  Other than that, we rely on other folks. 
We know a whole lot more about magnets!
Gene
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Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
r.cprmier

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« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 10:49:32 PM »

We know a whole lot more about magnets!

Not wanting to sound too stupid, but not knowing why either, why would artillery men wind up knowing a particular lot about magnetism?

What always made me laugh is that at Chanute, we were always taught that we would wind up forgetting everything we learned at school.  That is why they called them instructors NCOs...No Chance Outside.  The first thing I was told at my first PCS was by my boss (six stripes, hard-boiled and hard-assed) under no uncertain terms:  That was to damned well remember my theory.  And everything else; he hadn't the time or inclination to wipe my nose.  Know what, Gene?  he was right on the mark!

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
SteamGene

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« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2008, 11:55:54 PM »

Rich,
Wiithout getting into too much non-railroad detail, back in my day a battery was laid with an aiming circle.  One either laid by grid or magnetic.  Grid required survey.  Magnetic required floating the magnetic needle.  Helmets back then were made of steel and web gear had lots of metal, as did individual weapons, watches, glasses with steel frames, etc. When the tolerance is +/-3 mils (with 6400 mils in a circle), it was easy to lay out when one forgot that Magnetic North was way further than the M-14 held by the guard who was too close to the aiming circle.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
CHUG

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« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 12:10:30 AM »

steamgene with the m14 guy was he further? thanks
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