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Author Topic: Where in the world  (Read 3463 times)
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2008, 05:38:03 PM »

I wish I could see those J series...

here's the link, go half way down the page
http://www.polkcounty.org/saludagrade/TheSaludaGrade.html
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Santa Fe buff

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« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2008, 05:54:55 PM »

I wish I could see those J series...

here's the link, go half way down the page
http://www.polkcounty.org/saludagrade/TheSaludaGrade.html
It's so beautiful! And sad at the same time.
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- Joshua Bauer
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2008, 04:49:59 PM »

Interesting facts about the hill during the steam era. Santa Fe's were almost used exclusively on the hill and several were customized for the service. They had extra air pumps to keep the train line constantly chargerd, larger water glasses so they wouldn't run the boiler dry and a special watering system that sprayed water on the drivers to keep them cool. Apparently the brakes would get the drivers so hot they could fall off.
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2008, 05:31:02 PM »

... larger water glasses so they wouldn't run the boiler dry and a special watering system that sprayed water on the drivers to keep them cool. Apparently the brakes would get the drivers so hot they could fall off.

I am left wondering how a larger water glass would keep the boiler from running dry.

That is interesting about the water spray for cooling, although I suspect it was to prevent the tires from coming off the wheels, not the wheels off the axles. 
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2008, 07:53:27 PM »

water glasses, also called site glasses. were used on both sides of the cab to show the water level in the boiler. On the steep incline, they would have to keep the level of water a bit higher to prevent a low water problem. Injecting water into a boiler that is in a low water condition, could lead to a catastrophic  boiler explosion as the added water turns to steam upon hitting the overheating metal of the boiler causing a sudden and uncontrollable increase in pressure. Remember the engine on the Gettysburg RR that scalded the crew from a crown sheet failure ( low water ) that caused the FRA to come down hard on all steam tourist lines. Tires are heated on to the wheels, as they cool they get smaller and snug up to the wheel . Heating up the tire would cause it to expand and loosen from the wheel
« Last Edit: June 22, 2008, 08:20:24 AM by pdlethbridge » Logged
ebtnut

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« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2008, 01:54:20 PM »

The water glass is normally about 10" tall.  The "normal" water level for the boiler is shown with the water half-way up the glass on level track.  A full glass means you probably have too much water, and the loco won't steam as well.  No water and you have a problem!  Even on a shallow grade like 1%, there is a noticable change in the apparent water level.  Downgrade and the water level drops in the glass; upgrade and the water level rises.  Most railroads had main line grades of less than 2%, and an experienced fireman knew the road and knew what the water level variations would be.  On a 5% grade, the water levels would go beyond the "normal" limits, so a longer glass, especially with a long-boilered loco like a 2-10-2, would be useful.  Incidentally, the problem on the Gettysburg RR was maintenance-related.  One of the feed lines to the water glass got plugged with sediment, leaving what appeared to be a half-full glass.  Someone did not blow down the glass to assure a clean feed.  Also, they weren't paying close attention to how much time had elapsed between water feeds with the engine working hard.  I was on that train (but not in the cab).  It was not a pretty sight.
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glennk28

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« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2008, 08:24:23 PM »

SP had to ban the Cab Forwards from the Siskiyou Line (original Sacramento-Portland line) after one blew up.  Couldn't keep water over the crown sheet on that long boiler on the 3% upgrades.  gj
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