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Author Topic: Happy Canada Day  (Read 6332 times)
SteamGene

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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2008, 09:02:23 AM »

They do know the Star Spangled Banner though.

All five verses, Roger?  Including the violently anti-British one?   Cheesy
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Joe Satnik


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« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2008, 11:31:34 AM »

Another clue:

Here are some other important Canadian dates.  Can(ada) you ID them?

1-1-1922
12-1-1922
4-15-1923
5-1-1924
1-1-1947

Hint #1: Actual Canadian historical dates - not a joke.
Hint #2: All dates have the same thing in common.
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
rogertra


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« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2008, 02:44:18 PM »

Another clue:

Here are some other important Canadian dates.  Can(ada) you ID them?

1-1-1922
12-1-1922
4-15-1923
5-1-1924
1-1-1947

Hint #1: Actual Canadian historical dates - not a joke.
Hint #2: All dates have the same thing in common.

Jan. 01, 1922 Drivers in BC stopped driving on the left and started driving on the right.

Apr. 15, 1923 drivers in Nove Scoria started driving on the right.

May 01, 1924 May Day becomes a holiday in Canada?

Jan. 1, 1947, the Canadian Citizenship Act came into effect and Canadians finally became "Canadian citizens" rather than British Citizens living in Canada.
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SteamGene

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« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2008, 05:59:51 PM »

I thought Canadians and British were still "subjects."
Happy Fourth of July!
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
rogertra


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« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2008, 06:58:18 PM »

"I thought Canadians and British were still "subjects."
Happy Fourth of July!
Gene"

Canadian and Brits are still "subjects" because Canada is a Consitutional Monarchy, with the Queen as Head of State.  

However, prior to Jan. 01, 1947 all Canadians were British Citizens not Canadian Citizens.  That's the difference.
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2008, 09:30:42 PM »

Hint 2:  All dates have the same thing in common. 

Good going Roger, right hand side of the road driving was what I was looking for. 

1-1-1922 correct. (BC)

4-15-1923 correct (NS)

Continue, please. 

These dates are very important because these provinces became "independent" from British rule:  British Left Hand "Rule of the Road", that is. 

Hint 3: One of the dates corresponds to a "not quite yet a" province.

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik 
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
grumpy

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« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2008, 12:18:40 AM »

Newfoundland became a province of Canada
Don
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #22 on: July 08, 2008, 12:43:37 PM »

Thanks, Don for your input.

Just to close this out, I'll match the rest of the dates and provinces.  I dug around Google for this info.  I found all 5 provinces named at one site, but not all the dates.

The Provinces in the middle of Canada were already right hand side of the road, as much business/travel was with the US.  The coastal provinces remained with the British "left hand rule" until the following dates: 

Jan. 1, 1922 -- Britsh Columbia
Dec. 1, 1922 -- New Brunswick
Apr. 15, 1923 -- Nova Scotia
May 1, 1924 -- Prince Edward Island
Jan. 1, 1947 -- Newfoundland (became province in 1949)

Here is an interesting read - "The Year of Free Beef"

http://www.i18nguy.com/driver-side.html

Scroll a little more than 1/3 of the way down the page.

"The Geneva Convention on Road Traffic (1949)"

(Start Quote)
Article 9(1) of the United Nations' Geneva Convention on Road Traffic (1949)[21] requires each country to have a uniform direction of traffic, i.e. each country may have either left-hand traffic or right-hand traffic, but not both. The exact wording of the article is:

All vehicular traffic proceeding in the same direction on any road shall keep to the same side of the road, which shall be uniform in each country for all roads. Domestic regulations concerning one-way traffic shall not be affected.

Before that, a country could have different rules in different parts, for example Canada until the 1920s.
(End Quote)

This from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driving_on_the_left_or_right

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
 

 
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
Santa Fe buff

N&W


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« Reply #23 on: July 08, 2008, 05:51:38 PM »

Ah, yes, Dominion Day, 7-1-1867

Here are some other important Canadian dates.  Can(ada) you ID them?

1-1-1922
12-1-1922
4-15-1923
5-1-1924
1-1-1947

(My mom was raised in AB)

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
The first date has no data for any inportant Canadian events in History, according to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1922_in_Canada
Neither the second.
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- Joshua Bauer
Pacific Northern


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« Reply #24 on: July 08, 2008, 06:40:38 PM »

Ah, yes, Dominion Day, 7-1-1867

Here are some other important Canadian dates.  Can(ada) you ID them?

1-1-1922
12-1-1922
4-15-1923
5-1-1924
1-1-1947

(My mom was raised in AB)

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
The first date has no data for any inportant Canadian events in History, according to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1922_in_Canada
Neither the second.

Santa Fe
Read the posting prior to yours
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Pacific Northern
Joe Satnik


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« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2008, 10:40:50 AM »

Dear Santa Fe,

Sometimes you have to dig (Google) a little deeper to find the treasure (answers)...

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik

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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
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