ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 22, 2019, 09:11:34 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  Is this what 'Piggy Back' means!
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print
Author Topic: Is this what 'Piggy Back' means!  (Read 12169 times)
Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2007, 10:56:53 PM »

THATS NOT FUNNY. UNION PACIFIC DIDN'T MENA TO DO THAT STOP MAKING FUN OF THEM AND DO I REALLY HAVE TO SAY WHY I AM SAYIND THIS. COM ON UR FAVORITE RAILROADS HAVE HAD A CRASH NOW AND THEN.IN 1940 AND 2-10-0 OWNED BY THE ICRR FELL OF A BRIDGE INTO A RAVINE. AND IN 1885 A 2-6-0 FELL ON A TRESTLE I DON'T KNOW WHO IT WAS OWNED BY BUT GIVE THEM A BREAK.

Let me repeat after JM:Calm down. Wayyyyy down. Just 'cause "union pacific rules!!!!!!!!! is the best railroad" doesn't mean we can't give them some jazz over it.
Logged

Sam Clavis

The New Zealand Railways Logo


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2007, 02:01:20 AM »

He Just likes UP a lot. I like BR a lot and I'd be annoyed if someone made fun of them. But that pic is funny.
Logged

Im from New Zealand
Modelling Early Period BR in OO scale.
Sam
lanny

View Profile
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2007, 10:13:12 AM »

Seasaltchap,

You mentioned; "Destroyer !!!!! Looks more like the barrel for  the 15" shells of a Battleship!"

You're absolutely right, of course. Shows how far I am from a knowlegable person about things 'naval' ... I did mean 'Battleship' ... those really huge, formidable WWII floating fortresses. I think one, the "Iowan" or the "Missouri" (not sure which one), was refitted for combat action and saw action during one of the Iraq conflicts. Anyway, that barrel sure would be heavy! Amazing to think that it is just one small part of an immense mass of steel that floats on water!

HOplasserm80c,

Sorry that I offended you ... I had no intention of making fun of the UP as a RR. The photo I posted was sent to me by an 'over the road' UP locomotive engineer. I've never seen anything like that, so thought it might be interesting to others.

When I have a moment, I'll post a photo sent to me by the same person, of a CN/IC wreck. Speaking of IC wrecks, I remember seeing a photo of an E7 or E8 years ago, that was on the head end of 'The City of New Orleans' that hit a gas truck tanker trying to beat it across a RR crossing. The crew in the cab of the E unit were killed along with the trucker. That is very sad, and certainly not to be made fun of.

lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
lanny

View Profile
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2007, 10:56:06 AM »

Here is the 'promised' photo of a CN/IC wreck. I believe this happened in Canada, so probably these are not locomotives marked with "IC" lettering on the cab,  as currently seen in the US on the ICRR mainline.

THNAKFULLY (and suprisingly) no one was hurt!



lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2007, 12:26:12 PM »

Sorry if anything I did affended you. Here's a link to all the T&P wrecks:

http://www.texaspacificrailway.org/?p=8
Logged

HOplasserem80c

union paciifc rules!!!!!!!!it is the best railroad


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2007, 10:16:08 PM »

it is ok everyone sorry i yelled i just hate when people make fun of train wrecks or trains in general. my friends say trains a stupid and i get tierd of them saying that but it is ok, and once again i am sorry.
Logged
Matthew Ginkel


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2007, 11:03:55 PM »

This is a more common occurance than you might think, thankfully this time it was just a lone GP30, the engineer was reported to be under the infulence.


CSX work crew: I guess we wont be needing this!  Grin
Logged
JM


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2007, 02:16:15 AM »

Plasser, you're going to have to learn to stop overreacting.....just because someone pokes fun at something you like doesn't mean you can go off on a tangent and start yelling. My fiance makes fun of my ''tinker trains'' all the time, it's no big deal, not everyone is  impressed that I hand painted the 350+ figures that inhabit my empire, or all the re-painting and decaling  I did on the locos and rolling stock, or the thousands of details I included in the scenes on my layout.....it's NO BIG DEAL!!!  I don't have this hobby to impress anyone, I do it just for me and my enjoyment, if there are those that think it's stupid, that's their opinion and they can have it....I personally think that the goobers who spend the weekend sitting on the couch screaming at ball player guys on tv are stupid, but thats their ''hobby''  and thats my opinion. 
  In the future, Plasser, try not to get so worked up,you're going to find people that think this hobby is a waste of time and money and it's stupid all through life....and it's NO BIG DEAL!!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2007, 02:17:59 AM by JM » Logged
rogertra


View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2007, 03:00:49 AM »

Here is the 'promised' photo of a CN/IC wreck. I believe this happened in Canada, so probably these are not locomotives marked with "IC" lettering on the cab,  as currently seen in the US on the ICRR mainline.

THNAKFULLY (and suprisingly) no one was hurt!

[img width=348 height=500]http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/6603/cntrnwreckpd3.jpg[/

Two Canadian National Railway workers were pulled to safety on Thu Jan 4, 2007, after spending the night in a locomotive that slid down a steep hill in British Columbia's Thompson River Canyon Wed Jan 3, 2007.

The men were operating a Vancouver-bound freight train that went off the tracks after hitting a rock slide at about 1 a.m. local time (8 a.m. British time) on Canadian National's mainline, north of Lytton, British Columbia, CN spokesman Jim Feeny said.

Rescuers were able to use ropes to lower blankets and hot food to the train crew, but because of safety concerns decided to wait until daylight to attempt to bring them up the 50-metre (160-foot) embankment.

"It was steep and there were still some rocks coming down," Feeny said, adding that it was also safer to wait because the two men were not seriously injured.

The engineer and conductor were pulled to safety about seven hours after the accident in British Columbia's rugged Interior.

The accident has blocked CN's mainline through British Columbia for an undetermined amount of time, but the railway was working with Canadian Pacific Railway on temporarily rerouting trains.

Logged

lanny

View Profile
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2007, 11:11:21 AM »

Thanks for that information, Roger. Again, I emphasize that I'm thankful this had a very happy outcome!

lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


View Profile WWW
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2007, 12:34:40 PM »

Nice pics, Matthew. Looks like there IS a model for everything. Cheesy
Logged

Joe Satnik


View Profile WWW
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2007, 06:28:27 PM »

Dear Lanny and Roger,

Great pic and explanation. 

Do ya think that the engineer and conductor had their seat belts on?  What a ride, eh?

Can anyone talk about rock slide safety issues?  For instance, do railroads detect slides in a slide prone areas, signaling trains to stop?  Could the rumbling of an engine/train trigger a slide (on top of itself)?

Thanks. 

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik 
Logged

If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
SteamGene

View Profile
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2007, 07:04:58 PM »

The barrel in question was not for a destroyer.  Most allied WWII destroyers carried no guns llarger than a 5"38.  By 1942 the USN had standardized on 16" for battleships, 8" for heavy cruisers and 6" for light cruisers.  I'm not sure about the RN, though I know some of the battleships and battle cruisers (RODNEY, PRINCE OF WALES, HOOD) had 15" main batteries.  Whatever the barrel is, it's at least for a heavy cruiser, and I think a battleship, but not 15 or 16 iinch.  Both the RN and the USN had 14" and, I think, 12" battleships in WWII.  I'd guess it was one of those two calibers.
Gene
Logged

Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
lanny

View Profile
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2007, 07:49:18 PM »

Hi Joe,

Others will be able to give you a much more definitive answer. However, the times when we have taken Amtrak through the Rockies (the Amtrak Zephyr) or through Glacier Park (Amtrak Empire Builder), I have noticed areas through deep, rocky gorges where landslides or avalanches might be a real danger, many wires strung along the tracks.

I have 'assumed' that these are 'warning' wires ... should a rock slide or something hit the track, blocking it, the wires would obviously be broken and a warning signal sent out.

That is only an 'uneducated assumption, but the amount of wires in these grids seem to have some reason for being there, and it certainly isn't to hold back the mountain if it decides to slide.  :-)

lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
JM


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2007, 11:05:25 PM »

In one of my books on the early days of railroading in the US, i saw a picture of a 2-4-0 that rear-ended a stopped freight, blew through the caboose and ended up sitting atop an empty flat car, apparently the loco was so well balanced and firmly wedged on the flat car, and the flat was still able to be pulled....they left it on and took it to the yard...which I'm guessing wasn't too far away. Makes an interesting model subject.

I couldn't find the book with the pic in it that I was looking for, probably out on loan, but I did find an interesting pic in a book called..''This Was Railroading'' by George Abdill, on pg. 180 it shows a Mogul type loco perched atop the tender of another Mogul, caption says the Mogul rear ended the tender on the Great Northern near Tampico July 4 1899,  it was so securely wedged on the tender frame that both locos were towed to the shop.  Judging by the distance the Mogul traveled up on the tender it wasn't moving slow!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2007, 11:08:38 PM by JM » Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!