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| | |-+  Is this what 'Piggy Back' means!
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Author Topic: Is this what 'Piggy Back' means!  (Read 11741 times)
lanny

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« on: March 05, 2007, 07:46:17 PM »

Hi all,

Just wondering ('tongue in cheek' wondering :-) if this is what prototypical 'piggyback' freight is all about :-)

Evidently the grain train was going faster than it was supposed to be, and climbed right up on the back of the container train in front of it. The guy who sent it to me titled it 'restricted speed' ... he thinks someone is probably in big trouble.

lanny nicolet

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ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
JM


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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2007, 01:21:35 AM »

 Grin  OOOOOOPS!!!!   Looks like UP is gonna be doing some repair work!   I wonder if they took the loco off the well car and moved it or just left it on?
« Last Edit: March 06, 2007, 06:25:59 PM by JM » Logged
martin_lumber

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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2007, 11:16:17 AM »

That must make it a little easier to clean up the mess! I never knew that was possible!

Phil
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Seasaltchap

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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2007, 07:00:58 PM »


What weight will these well wagons take?

Surely the loco is more than 2 containers.
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Phoenix AZ: OO enthusiast modelling GWR 1895-1939, Box Station Wiltshire; S&DJR Writhington Colliery, Nr. Radstock.

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Mr Mekanik

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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2007, 07:56:13 PM »

Look at it this way. Now they won't need a crane to lift up the loco, it's ready to be hauled away.
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Nathan

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« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2007, 07:59:10 PM »

Two Questions:

1:  Is the 'ramp' version of the well car avaliavle in all scales?

2:  Does the combination shown count as one train, one train in two sections, or two trains?
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2007, 10:46:19 PM »

That's amazing! I never thought that would happen!  Shocked
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lanny

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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2007, 11:35:17 PM »

I, too, question how the container 'well' car could support the weight of that size diesel ... but being a 'steam era' modeler, I'll have to leave the answser to that to the 'modern diesel experts' on the forum.

I am, however, pretty well convinced that well container car would not have handled a standard or large size Mountain or 2-10-2 that tried to climb up like that for a 'piggy back' ride.  :-)

lanny nicolet
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ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
JM


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« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2007, 02:37:56 AM »

In one of my books on the early days of railroading in the US, i saw a picture of a 2-4-0 that rear-ended a stopped freight, blew through the caboose and ended up sitting atop an empty flat car, apparently the loco was so well balanced and firmly wedged on the flat car, and the flat was still able to be pulled....they left it on and took it to the yard...which I'm guessing wasn't too far away. Makes an interesting model subject.
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Seasaltchap

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« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2007, 03:06:06 AM »


lanny : I attach a pic' of a special 18-wheel wagon used by the LNER to transport naval gun barrels.

The pic' was taken in 1942 in the freight yards outside Paddington Station, London.


© 1981, OPC.
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Phoenix AZ: OO enthusiast modelling GWR 1895-1939, Box Station Wiltshire; S&DJR Writhington Colliery, Nr. Radstock.

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lanny

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« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2007, 03:44:57 PM »

JM,

Your account of the 2-4-0 rear-ending the feight, 'blowing through' the caboose, makes me feel very sorry for any workmen who might have been inhabiting that caboose when the steamer hit!

Seasaltchap,

Is that one of the barrels of a naval gun used on destroyers?! Wow!, what an immense thing that was! It would be interesting to compare the weight of that Naval gun to the weight of a modern diesel locomotive!

lanny nicolet
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ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
JM


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« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2007, 03:49:13 PM »

I agree Lanny, not a pleasant thought about anyone who may have been in the caboose.
 I don't have the book here with me, but when I get a chance I'll post the title at least and see if I can scan the pic.  It's a very interesting pic to be sure.
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Seasaltchap

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« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2007, 08:30:49 PM »


Destroyer !!!!!

Looks more like the barrel for  the 15" shells of a Battleship!
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Phoenix AZ: OO enthusiast modelling GWR 1895-1939, Box Station Wiltshire; S&DJR Writhington Colliery, Nr. Radstock.

Interested in making friends on the site with similar interests.
HOplasserem80c

union paciifc rules!!!!!!!!it is the best railroad


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« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2007, 08:55:53 PM »

THATS NOT FUNNY. UNION PACIFIC DIDN'T MENA TO DO THAT STOP MAKING FUN OF THEM AND DO I REALLY HAVE TO SAY WHY I AM SAYIND THIS. COM ON UR FAVORITE RAILROADS HAVE HAD A CRASH NOW AND THEN.IN 1940 AND 2-10-0 OWNED BY THE ICRR FELL OF A BRIDGE INTO A RAVINE. AND IN 1885 A 2-6-0 FELL ON A TRESTLE I DON'T KNOW WHO IT WAS OWNED BY BUT GIVE THEM A BREAK.
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JM


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« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2007, 10:13:46 PM »

Dude you need to calm down!  wayyyy down!!!   as long as no one gets hurt/killed it IS funny. The UP isn't your personal railroad so why are you so upset?
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