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Author Topic: A Q about 4-6-0 for Bachmann  (Read 15511 times)
mmiller

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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2008, 09:06:01 PM »

I guess while I'm about it...here's the new 4-6-0 compared to SPNG #18...



I know there are some significant differences beyond obvious "cosmetic" ones, like the driver spacing, but I think that it's probably a do-able conversion...especially for a "stand off scale" modeler like me


(BTW I understand that is Cliff Grandt, of Grandt Line, standing in the 18's cab)
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mike miller
San Juan Pacific Lines
On31.17 California 3' narrow gauge
Royce Wilson

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« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2008, 10:00:45 PM »

Recentenly I picked up a copy of a book called "Rails,Sagebrush and pine "and there are some very interesting conversions as Charlie Mutschler pointed out, particularly the 4-6-0. I don't understant why this narrow road "Sumpter Valley" never got more attention than it did as it such a neat road to model with the wood loads piled as high as the top of the engine smoke stack. besides from what I understand Oregon is a beautiful place anyway.
I think the Portland convention will help that out though.                                                                                                                                                                                  Royce Wilson
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Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2008, 03:47:15 PM »

Rails Sagebrush & Pine is a great book.  There is more there than just No. 50.  There is a Class B Climax which came originally from Hallack & Howard in New Mexico which might be close to the steel cab version of the On30 Climax for conversion.  I think that one had a Radley - Hunter stack instead of the cabbage stack on many of the Oregon Lumber and SV locos.

Happy research and happy modeling.  The SV is vastly under appreciated and the SV restoration people have done a beautiful job on the their Hesiler (W. H. Eccles No. 3) and SV ALCO mike No. 19.  well worth the visit.  But be aware that because it is an all volunteer operation, the train only run week ends. 

Charlie Mutschler
-30-
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Royce Wilson

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« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2008, 04:38:43 PM »

Charlie
         Was there a special trick to handeling the wood slabs from the top of those tenders in a safe manner?
that sure would make a intresting model,

                                                                             Royce Wilson
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japasha

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« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2008, 04:53:18 PM »

That is Cliff in the cab of #18.  There are a few more differences, the smokebox is the extended type for an ash net used only with a coal burner. #18 does not have one and has a shorter smokebox. The wheel spacing isn't exact but is passable. The domes and an SP type cab would be the harder parts to model.

I have modified a number of G size Tweetsies to look like #18 over the years. Not so hard once you bite the bullet. As stated by others, they make passable models. This is the way HO was for many years. Guys like Bill Schopp were wizards doing conversions.
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Frisco


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« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2008, 09:28:05 PM »

Thanks, for the photo's that looks much more easy. The SV is a great ride and all the workers are verry freindly and can anser all your quistions. The problem with them is unless you come towards it from Idaho you have to drive through about a day of dead grass and towns that have a sign for pop 2.
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Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2008, 03:30:15 PM »

Royce, looking at the photos in _Rails Sagebrush and Pine_, and observing the crew of W. H. Eccles No. 3, the practice seems to have been to stack the first row back from the gangway low enough to not interfere with the cab roof, and to stack the rows behind much higher.  The fireman could pull a stick of wood off the top of the pile using his poker, which looks looks the usual fireplace poker but much longer and much heaver, so that he can adjust wood in the firebox when needed.  I don't think the current SV people have wooded No. 3 up as high as the photos in the book on any of the times i have been there. 

I would think that pulling a piece of wood down from a high stack would call for a bit of care and experience, to avoid braining the fireman or hitting the engineer with a bounced piece.  I think the wood for the SV was cut to about 30 inches long - but that's just recollection, not given as fact. 

Interesting subject, though. 
Charlie
-30-
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Gunslinger87

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« Reply #22 on: August 06, 2008, 01:47:48 AM »

Does anyone know where I could find more Photos of B-mann's new 4-6-0?
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finderskeepers

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« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2008, 12:08:06 AM »

More photos of upcoming bachmann releases are on this webpage
www.voiemetrique.org/
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NarrowGSouth

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« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2008, 10:44:44 PM »

Disclaimer: The statement below is by no means a biased statement in anyway, well, maybe just a little bit.

Well who says Bachmann can't produce the other 4-6-0's? I, personally think it was smart for Bachmann to choose a well known eastern prototype, which has been immortalized by the Tweetsie Railroad theme park.

I also think they chose the ET&WNC ten-wheeler because they were familiar with the prototype. For those drawing blanks to that, I am referring to the large scale 4-6-0.

However, I hope that Bachmann will not limit itself to one 4-6-0 and considers the RGS, F&CC, SPNG, and D&RG (COUGHT12COUGH) for future release.

NGSouth


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finderskeepers

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« Reply #25 on: August 27, 2008, 05:25:09 PM »

Sure does look a lot like the ex Alaska engine at the Huckleberry railroad in Flint Michigan though, like the green jacket too

picture by Michael Allen
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C.S.R.R. Manager


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« Reply #26 on: August 28, 2008, 03:39:02 PM »

Michael, that got me thinking...  It would be cool to compare the new Bachmann loco to the Alaska #152.  I've got to admit, it's really close.  The only major difference I see is that the tender on #152 looks more like the tender from the 2-8-0.  The cab on the model also looks longer, the domes are bigger... and the snowplow, obviously.

And I agree about the green boiler -- That would be a great alternate paint scheme for the new Bachmann loco.

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Frisco


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« Reply #27 on: August 28, 2008, 03:53:06 PM »

I hope they do another version like they did with the 4-4-0. I am holding my breath for something more exciting (for me) at this years National Narrow Gauge convention this September. Kiss Smiley
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WVM_guy

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« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2008, 12:39:11 PM »

Oh come on, can't you guys tell a West Virginia Midland 4-6-0 when ya see one  Tongue

Actually, the domes on the WVM unit are round and not fluted, but uh....we replaced them in 1945...yeah, that's it.

« Last Edit: September 01, 2008, 12:46:04 PM by WVM_guy » Logged
finderskeepers

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« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2008, 08:31:51 AM »

Here is a better shot of the alaska engine, sure is pretty no?
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