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Author Topic: EZ Track layouts here  (Read 20127 times)
Terry Toenges


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« on: March 08, 2007, 06:12:58 PM »

Here are a few EZ track layouts I came up with.  These were up on the old site.
One is the WGH layout using 22" radius curves.
I have some more pics of sidings I'll put up shortly.

The pieces that have the white strips across them are the 2" straights.
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[imghttp://www.sarget.com/trains/traintips/bach/eztrack/bachezyarda-24.jpg[/img]http://2.

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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2007, 06:15:18 PM »

The first one didn't show up
1.
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Bill Baker

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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2007, 06:47:19 PM »

Nice work Terry...looks like they will be a lot of fun.
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Bill
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2007, 12:54:39 PM »

Some EZ Track sidings -
-------------------------------------
Passing sidings
One problem with making a passing siding on the straights with EZT (EZ Track) is that (with one exception - #5 below) you need a 2" straight.
That is, unless you want to cut the EZ Track.
As of today, 2" straights aren't sold separately.
They are sold with Bachmann's 90* crossing. It comes with four 2" straights.
Below are 6 examples of how you can make a passing siding using 18" radius curves.
This won't work with 15" or 22" radius curves without some kind of "S" curve somewhere.
------------------------------------------
1. Below -  No straights between curve and turnout.   ***NOT A GOOD IDEA ***
Diverging leg = left - 18"r - 18"r - right
Straight leg = left - 3" - 4 1/2" - 9" - "2 1/4" - 2" - 9 - right
Dimensions = 38 3/4" long   6 3/4" wide

---------------------------------------------
2. Below -  2" straights between curve and turnout. 
Diverging leg = left - 2" -18"r - 18"r - 2" - right
Straight leg = left - 9" - 2 1/4" - 2" - 2" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 42 1/4" long   7 3/4" wide

-----------------------------------------------
3. Below -  2 1/4" straights between curve and turnout. 
Diverging leg = left - 2 1/4" -18"r - 18"r - 2 1/4" - right
Straight leg = left - 2" - 9" - 4 1/2" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 42 1/2" long   7 3/4" wide

--------------------------------------------------
4. Below -  3" straights between curve and turnout. 
Diverging leg = left - 3" - 18"r - 18"r - 3" - right
Straight leg = left - 9" - 3" - 3" - 2" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 44" long   8 1/4" wide

-------------------------------------------------------
5. Below -  4 1/2" straights between curve and turnout.
 *** The only combination that will work without a 2" straight. ***
Diverging leg = left - 4 1/2" - 18"r - 18"r - 4 1/2" - right
Straight leg = left - 9" - 3" - 3" - 2 1/4" - 2 1/4" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 48 1/2" long   9" wide

---------------------------------------------------------
6. Below -  9" straights between curve and turnout. 
Diverging leg = left - 9" - 18"r - 18"r - 9" - right
Straight leg = left - 9" - 9" - 2" - 4 1/2" - 2 1/4" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 54 1/2" long   11 1/4" wide

------------------------------------------------------------
7. Below - Opposing turnouts
Diverging leg = left - 2 1/4" - left - right - 2 1/4" - right
Straight leg = left - 4 1/2" - 3" - 2" - 9" - 9" - right
Dimensions = 45 1/2" long   7 3/4" wide

----------------------------------------------------------------
    EZ Track yard
Here is an EZ Track yard made without cutting pieces and using the 2" straights, standard turnouts, and 18" curves.
The below pics use the diverging legs for the straight sections and the straight leg
for the curved sections.
Add straights equally between the two curves and the straights to make it longer.
------------------------------------------------------------------
    1. Below - Can be passing siding or two track yard.
Diverging leg  = right - 9" - 2" - 2 1/4" - left
Straight leg = right - 18"r - 18"r - left
Dimensions = 34 1/2" long   10 1/2" wide (to lowest corner of turnout)

---------------------------------------------------------------------
    2. Below - Four track yard.
Top set of turnouts -
Diverging leg  = right - 9" - 2" - 2 1/4" - left
Straight leg = right - 18"r - 18"r - left
Second set of turnouts -
Diverging leg  = right - 9" - 9" - 2" - 9" - left
Third set of turnouts -
Diverging leg  = right - 9" - 9" - 4 1/2" - 2" - 2 1/4" - 9" - 9" - left
Dimensions = 65 1/4" long   17 1/4" wide (to lowest corner of turnout)

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japasha

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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2007, 04:40:45 PM »

Terry,

That was a nice set of photos. That set shows exactly how the layout looks with EZ-track. The last photos of the WGH-based layout is very good. The major magazines leave out this part and it's very important for a newcomer to see how it really fits together. Max in the UK should study this. His layout is nice but a little more work with the same outline could be outstanding in a small place.
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JWBDolphins

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« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2007, 07:15:33 PM »

Very nice!  I'm starting to expand my collection of E-Z Track and am always looking for EZT layouts and tips/ideas.

I did have a question -  you mentioned on the "#1 picture" that:

  "No straights between curve and turnout.   ***NOT A GOOD IDEA ***"

I'm curious as to why that is?  Is it because its too tight for some locos to get through (like say a 4-10-4?) or what?  I've been noodling some layouts and was thinking of doing something like your "#7 opposing turnouts" but put the "left left" connected directly to each other without the 2 1/4" straight in between - I'm now reconsidering that idea!

Thanks!
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2007, 07:25:19 PM »

JWB
In the #1 pic, it creates an "S" turn. The more straight you have between opposing curves, the less chance of derailment with longer cars.
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pds1506

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« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2007, 04:20:26 PM »

Terry,
On the sidings you have pictured, did you use the standard EZ track switches?  That would be versus the #5 switches?  I want to make sure I get the right thing to try this.
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2007, 11:18:14 AM »

PDS - Yes. On the siding pics, I just used the standard EZ Turnouts.
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Jonathan MacCormack

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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2007, 08:28:20 PM »

Terry,

How come layouts featured by most do not include "S" curves for visual variety in layout configurations?

I guess out layout dimemnsions have a lot to do with it.

Comment?

Oh well.

Jonathan
« Last Edit: June 24, 2007, 09:22:16 PM by Jonathan MacCormack » Logged
Bojangle
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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2007, 10:24:35 PM »

It seems to be a consensus that S curves are not good, especially on longer cars.

I like the EZ track for easy setup, but my steam locos don't like the turnouts, even going straight through. The pilot trucks derail, especially 2 wheel.   The frog appears to be molded too shallow, and the guard rail is short.  I replaced the EZ turnouts with Atlas manual snap switches.  By using the included 1/3-18" section, they match up with EZ, you just have to build up a roadbed underneath.  Another advantage ot the Atlas is, because they are a 2/3-18" curve, you can use 2 - 1/3 18" pieces and transition back parallel with a closer track spacing.

I'm certainly no expert on turnouts, I just notice the Atlas is smoother with no  bumps or rumble.

It is usually advised that for a "block" system, you need 2 or 3 more sidings than the number of trains you plan to run.  Otherwise, one train is confined to the main line, and the others are confined to their perspective siding.  As an alternative, you can have a "staging" yard with many spurs to back into, all connected to the main lines, as Terry has shown.
Bo
« Last Edit: June 25, 2007, 12:29:39 AM by Bojangle » Logged
Jonathan MacCormack

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« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2007, 03:37:37 PM »

Bojangle,

My question related to "S" curves NOT turnouts and other unrequested garbage.
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pds1506

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« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2007, 04:10:51 PM »

Terry,

I noticed you made a comment about Bachmann turnouts.  I have four Bachmann crossovers.  I have exchanged them several times as they seem to be prone to derailment.  Based on your note, this appears to be a problem you are seeing with all the Bachmann turnouts.  If I am understanding your comments correctly (which I may not be), it doesn't appear there is much you can do to make the Bachmann work better.  It does sound like your idea of using Atlas turnouts might be a good option.  Could you use the Atlas track that already has the road bed and just cut off the plastic locking mechanism on the Atlas and EZ track ends? Let me know and feel free to clarify if I am misunderstanding anything.  Thanks!
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duker1

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« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2007, 07:00:53 PM »

I believe that Jonathan is somewhat confused. Appears that Bojangle was answering both Jon's question on 'S' and the question/comment about turnouts. Believe that could have been picked up when Bo had different paragraphs to answer those questions but was obviously missed by Jonathan.

The Duke....
A High C....
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2007, 07:21:58 PM »

Jonathan,
There are an abundance of "S" curves on the pics above, depending on which direction I set the turnouts.
As for everybody else, you tell me. Sounds like you're just dying to jump in with your comments on the merits or non-merits of the "S" curve.
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