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Author Topic: Video of making stub switches  (Read 3919 times)
fsm1000

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« on: November 29, 2008, 09:12:40 PM »

I am currently uploading some videos of how I make stub switches.
I hope someone finds them useful Smiley
Of course they can be found from the link on my main site as usual.
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mtlatc


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« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2008, 12:17:14 AM »

Well...I guess I'm lost...where are they posted?

QUOTE: "Of course they can be found from the link on my main site as usual."

Where is that??? NO LINK HERE!

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richG
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« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2008, 12:51:51 PM »

Here is his link I found in the Trains.com forum. Scroll down the page until you see the stub switch video link. Model railroading stub switches video
http://fsm1000.googlepages.com/

Rich
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2008, 03:20:30 PM »

Rich, thanks for the link.  I just watched all four parts.  Some of it left me guessing just what the demonstrator was doing - a few close up shots would have helped a lot.  And I don't think he ever told us what kind of glue he was using.  But over all, it was a good demonstration of a quick way of building stub turnouts.  I assume they work for the author, although we were never shown a train running through one.  My only doubts about the method stem from the lack of wing rails at the frog.  I don't remember ever seeing a turnout, split type or stub type, without them.  Even cast frogs have them cast in.  I cannot say that I have read what purpose they serve in the real world but assume they act to counter balance the guard rails - if an axle is suddenly accelerated sideways by the guard rail, the wing rail keeps the wheel in the guard rail flange way from climbing over the stock rail.
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richG
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2008, 03:58:08 PM »

I made some HO scale stubs a few years ago and they were a nice challenge.


Link & pin coupler at the top of the photo. Oversize coupler. Code 100 HO scale track but captures the flavor of the era.

Rich
« Last Edit: November 30, 2008, 04:07:04 PM by richG » Logged
Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2008, 07:54:45 PM »

Also, I think if a wheel "picks" the frog point (guard rail space too wide) it might rebound the axle allowing the other wheel to jump over the outside rail, next to the guard rail, similar as you described.

On the diverging leg, a properly designed model wing rail will shorten the "no rail" drop zone in the flangeway.  (just playing here with a turnout and truck/wheelset)  Cheesy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch#Stub_switch

How about this layout?
http://www.dochemp.com/switch.html
« Last Edit: November 30, 2008, 08:34:03 PM by Yampa Bob » Logged

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richG
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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2008, 08:36:02 PM »

The rails bend. Below you can see where I relievd the web on the rails with a grinder to make bending a little easier. One turnout in the yard has broken rails with a hinge.  The average length of rail with no spikes is about 2.4 inches to 2.8 inches in HO scale.

It can become a problem when the humidity changes a lot in the cellar. You can see for yourself. Prototypes had the same problems with this type of turnout.

Rich
« Last Edit: November 30, 2008, 08:40:56 PM by richG » Logged
Yampa Bob

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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2008, 03:45:01 PM »

In order to keep the rails in gauge, I assume some of the ties have to move with the rails. Doesn't that create problems with the bedding material?

The unspiked length of 2.8 inches HO equates to 20 feet full scale. I can see why they are not practical for real railroads.
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Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
richG
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2008, 04:15:57 PM »

My stubs where made with code 100 rail. Vastly oversize. That is why the scale twenty feet or so. Prototype roads did not use heavy rail like my stubs. The stubs on main lines where pretty much gone by 1900. The break in the rail was the real weak point. A few narrow gauge roads kept stubs in the yards for quite a few years.
http://books.google.com/books?id=w8E3AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA91&dq=stub+switch

Rich
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2008, 09:37:48 PM »

Bob, the moving rails were not spiked to the ties below.  They were spaced with steel tie rods, threaded each end, with a nut on each side of each rail.  The rails slid back and forth on top the their ties.

These tie rods can be simulated on H0 gauge stub switches using steel pins soldered into holes in the rails with pairs of pins joined by plastic tubing to maintain electrical isolation.
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the Bach-man
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« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2008, 12:21:14 AM »

Dear All,
This is why real railroaders say "Bending the iron" when throwing a switch.
Have fun!
the Bach-man
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Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2008, 12:33:50 AM »

OIC, that makes sense. Thanks for the clarification.

Would flex track be more suitable for the "bending" section? If so, there could be more spur tracks. Sorta like a flexible "turntable".  Cheesy
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Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2008, 12:43:56 AM »

A stub turnout is very much like a turntable in its alignment, though the turntable was more accurate in its alignment by eye than a stub's mechanical alignment.
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JerryB

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« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2008, 01:45:27 PM »

<snip> Would flex track be more suitable for the "bending" section? <snip>
Flex track, as delivered, wouldn't really work for stub switches. The ties need to be fixed to the 'ground and the rails just sitting on them. Also, the ties need to be longer than standard lengths to accommodate the sideways motion of the rails. Note that at least several ties are longer in RichG's well done stubs.

If one is using flex track, the last several ties would need to be completely removed and replaced with gauge bars per Jim Banner's post above. Then wood (or other material) ties would be glued under the ends of the moving rail.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
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