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Author Topic: Real train track  (Read 7789 times)
adari

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« on: December 25, 2008, 01:44:17 PM »

Where can I get real Pennsylvania rr train track or any other railroad of real train track. I have been lookingfor some for some time. Where can I buy some. I want some so that I can use it for a shelf.  Thanks
Adari
« Last Edit: December 25, 2008, 02:02:36 PM by adari » Logged
richG
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2008, 03:42:03 PM »

Real railroad track is quite large and would not be useful for a shelf layout. Smiley

You did not specify what gauge track.  There many online railroad shops on the 'Net. Is there a local hobby shop in your area?

Rich
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az2rail


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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2008, 03:56:47 PM »

 It would be very heavy, but if that is what you want, go for it. Try a railroad yard, or maybe a scrap metal place. Any industry along side a track may have a peice they will let you have. And talk to the guys that lay track. They would more than likely give you some.

Bruce
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2008, 08:05:52 PM »

It would be very heavy, but if that is what you want, go for it. Try a railroad yard, or maybe a scrap metal place. Any industry along side a track may have a peice they will let you have. And talk to the guys that lay track. They would more than likely give you some.

Bruce

It's almost 5 feet from rail to rail, making it much too large for a shelf. Also, rail generally weighs up to 150 lbs per foot, x 2 rails, x however many feet of "shelf" you want", PLUS the weight of the solid wood ties....

You really don't want a shelf made of of real train track.

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Cascade Northern

Cascade Northern Railroad


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« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2008, 08:18:08 PM »

There is also the fact that the rail could be cut down to a smaller length such as say 1/4 foot long.  The shelf however would still need to be reinforced to hold the weight of the rail.
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Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2008, 08:36:43 PM »

It's no different than building a bookcase with bricks. Saw the rail into 9" lengths, stack them up at ends and middle with pine 1 X 10s between.
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Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
JerryB

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« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2008, 11:10:57 PM »

Where can I get real Pennsylvania rr train track or any other railroad of real train track. <snip>

If you Google "Railroad Track," you will see ~1,910,000 hits. That Google search took ~0.10 seconds.

One of the first hits is A&K Railroad Materials, Inc.:

http://www.akrailroad.com/Home/tabid/36/Default.aspx

They have ties, including several grades of used ones (called "relay ties"), along with switch ties. They have permanent tie sales sites in 11 locations across the U.S. See:

http://www.akrailroad.com/OnlineCatalog/Products/RailroadTies/tabid/61/Default.aspx

They also catalog rail from 12# / yard up to 152# / yard. See a table of sizes at:

http://www.akrailroad.com/OnlineCatalog/RailJointBars/TeeRailSectionsData/tabid/76/Default.aspx

Their full catalog has joint bars, switch frogs and all manner of track construction tools and equipment. It is available on-line or can be ordered through the website.

Lots of the other 1,909,999 Google hits offer similar rail, ties, parts and tools for track laying. All you need to is contact some of them.

<snip> . . . rail generally weighs up to 150 lbs per foot . . . <snip>

Paul M:
You are correct about track being very large and heavy, but the heaviest U.S. mainline rail is actually ~152# / yard (or ~51# / foot), not 150# / foot.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
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az2rail


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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2008, 09:59:57 AM »

I was assuming that Adari is looking to a small section of rail, not the entire thing. [2 rails and ties]

In as much as the weight may make it not very practical, I could see a section of rail with a model train on it looking pretty cool.

Bruce
« Last Edit: December 26, 2008, 10:04:30 AM by az2rail » Logged

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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2008, 01:01:10 PM »

If you want to spike it down, add a little history and head out to Tremonton Utah and walk the roadbed of the old Transcontinental railroad. You can find old used spikes along the roadbed. I did.
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thirdrail

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« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2008, 08:19:58 PM »

Some gift shops at Tourist railroads sell short lengths of rail (~3"), painted with felt on the bottom to use as bookends. I have a pair given me years ago by a friend at L. B. Foster, a track material seller. Even a 3" length is pretty heavy.
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adari

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« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2008, 10:51:26 PM »

what i meant when i said shelf was to use the flange as something to hold pictures. not for a acctuall train layout shelf but just hooked up to the walls to hold pictures
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jsmvmd

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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2008, 09:53:53 AM »

Dear Adari,

You might talk to your local vo-tech school that teaches welding, or a local welding shop to see where they could send you. 

The NS main line in Altoona is 141 lb to the yard, manufactured in 1971, up at the Coburn crossing, for those of you who know wherof I speak.  I have heard from a very good friend that he saw 160 lb rail in the Rose Yard.  I have not yet looked for it, but will this year. 

I have a friend in the scouts whose father teaches welding at the vo-tech, who made a one ft piece into an anvil. It works great! And as Elwood Blues would say:  "Strong stuff!"

Best Wishes, and a Happy New Year to All!

Jack
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Guilford Guy


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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2008, 03:21:20 PM »

Will probably rip out your wall... Wink
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Alex

grumpy

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« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2008, 01:47:05 AM »

I have 2 pieces each about 6" long. Both pieces were bought at farm sales .They were being used for anvils. I would suggest a blacksmith shop as a possibility. A cut piece would sell for a dollar a pound.
Don
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Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2008, 09:51:09 AM »

You could get one small piece, then using Woodland Scenics latex molds and lightweight Hydrocal make several, paint them up with rusty black or whatever you prefer.
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I know what I wrote, I don't need a quote
Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
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