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Author Topic: stripping paint  (Read 1645 times)
pdlethbridge
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« on: March 25, 2009, 06:57:58 PM »

         I read at the Brooklyn terminal site that one can use easy off oven cleaner to strip paint. Has anyone heard about this? Go down page for info.
 http://www.bronx-terminal.com/?cat=20
« Last Edit: March 25, 2009, 07:06:57 PM by pdlethbridge » Logged
Guilford Guy


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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2009, 07:07:24 PM »

I believe that is for stripping Solvent Based Paints.
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Alex

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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2009, 08:51:14 PM »

Suggest reading this page. According to Tim Warris, oven cleaner won't harm plastics, but I would sure use gloves, face mask and eye protection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_hydroxide

Known commonly as lye or caustic soda. Unlike baking soda, however, it is not to be taken internally, because it is highly damaging to human tissue—particularly the eyes.
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2009, 09:37:20 PM »

Dear Friends,

Did not know this could be used as a paint stripper.

Bob,

The Wikipedia link is very informative.  Lye or alkali burns penetrate tissues, and thus can be damaging to mucous membranes, versus acid burns which form a shallow scar and usually do not penetrate as deeply.

Another interesting note is a 0.5M solution is considered to be caustic.  One humorous note in an old OMNI magazine asked the question: "Got mole problems?  Call Avogadro 6.04 x 10 to the 23rd power."  I guess it is funny to we who like chemistry.

Another one is radioactive cats have 18 half-lives.

Best Wishes,

Jack
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2009, 11:24:55 PM »

That reminds me of Mr Murphy chemistry class in high school. I won some jelly beans because I knew Avogadro's  number
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grumpy

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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2009, 11:54:15 PM »

I have used Easy Off oven cleaner for cleaning off paint . It will also remove decals . You will have to do a bit of scraping but it works quite well . It is an irritant to nasal passages .
Don
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OkieRick

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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2009, 11:44:24 PM »


What type material are you taking paint off?  I'm going to be removing paint off three Proto 2000 diesel locomotives my bro-in-law gave me this weekend.  They're BN GP18 & 20 and a GN SD7 locos.  These are die-cast metal.

I think when I was younger and more honest with myself "die-cast metal" was called "pot-metal." ...cheapest metal you could find.

Okie Rick
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2009, 12:23:49 AM »

I have touted Easy-Off as a paint stripper for years.

Don't buy the low fume variety. Regular flavor....extra stinky.

Grab a cheap sealed tupperware style container from Wallyworld. Spray the model and seal and let sit. I have stripped diecast, styrene, resin and aluminum with this method.

And have never eaten a body.

Sid
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2009, 09:12:01 AM »

The latest issue of Model Railroader magazine (May 2009) has an article entitled: "Strip, detail, and repaint a diesel switcher". Most of the article deals with adding detailing to an NW2 engine; but the first step concerns stripping paint.

Ray
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