ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 17, 2019, 01:05:23 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  advice on a kitbash
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: advice on a kitbash  (Read 2813 times)
Paul W.

View Profile
« on: March 26, 2007, 08:15:53 PM »

Help!
I'm modeling in large scale, but figured that the answer to this could come from any scale.
I'm in the process of cutting down the length of a tender to make a shorter model. I've taken it apart, marked it with tape where I need to make the cuts, now the problem. I can cut it with either a band saw or a coping saw (I'll gladly like to hear how others cut down models), but my real question is what is the best thing I can use to fill in the seams once I have glued it back together?
Thank you all for any help and advice with this

Logged

Happy Steamin'

Paul
rogertra


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2007, 08:22:04 PM »

Do NOT cut with any power tools.

Cutting with any power tools WILL melt the plastic.

Score the cut lines with a hobby knife and then use model saw and mitrebox, if the tender will fit, to cut by hand.

Logged

WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2007, 08:23:02 PM »

Try using a thick CA adhesive and reinforce the joint line with a strip of styrene from the inside. The CA will fill any gaps and leave you with a permanent repair that wont shrink and show the seam under the paint.

Sid
Logged

Kevin Strong


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2007, 09:47:13 PM »

A variable speed band saw will work very nicely to cut the tender. Also, you can use a micro saw blade in a Dremel tool set to a very low speed. This is a minature saw blade, typically between 1/2" and 1" diameter, and really, really thin. I don't know if Micro-Mark sells them or not. I got mine from a train show a few years back.

As for filling the gap, the thick CA will work, but is difficult to sand smooth. I'd recommend something like either Bondo (the stuff used in automotive bodywork) or "Squadron Green" putty, which is available from the hobby shop. These putties are much easier to sand and work, as that's what they're designed for. I'll use CA when filling gaps in something that's supposed to simulate wood, because I can use a coarse sandpaper to sand things down, and the scratches will blend in with the wood grain. For a tender side where you definitely want a smooth surface when all is said and done, you'll want to use a proper putty.

Later,

K
Logged

Paul W.

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2007, 10:18:27 PM »

Thank you all very much!
Kevin, the putty you are talking about, do you sand it once dried, or just smooth it while pliable? If you sand it once dried, do you use a fine wet/dry paper?

I definitly want a smooth finish when done.


Thanks again,
Logged

Happy Steamin'

Paul
Kevin Strong


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2007, 10:49:24 PM »

Yes, you'll sand it once it's dried. You can smooth it more-or-less even when applying it, but both the Squadron Green and Bondo will shrink back slightly as it's drying. To sand, use a wet-or-dry sandpaper of fine to very fine grit with a little water. If there is nearby rivet detail, plan on having to redo at least one or two of them on either side of the splice.

Later,

K
Logged

THB-DAVE

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2007, 09:15:45 AM »

Use Squadron  putty to fill the gap and sand smooth with fine grit sandpaper,1200 grit. You can thin the putty by adding testers glue to make a finer paste or use a new product called "Mr. Surficer' which you paint on to fill panel gaps. It comes in 3 thicknesses, 500, 1000 and 1200. Tank modellers use it alot.

David
Logged
Paul W.

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2007, 04:40:53 PM »

Thank you all very much!
If I don't find any of the Squadron putty at the show in York, I'll stop at my hobby center on my way home and pick it up.
Well, it's off to cut 'er in half.

Thanks again,
Logged

Happy Steamin'

Paul
lanny

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2007, 11:18:01 PM »

THB-Dave,

You mentioned '1200 grit' paper for smoothing Green Squadron putty. I use the SGP but the finest grit I have (obtained at my LHS) is 600 emery. Where can I find the 1200 grit?

Thanks much!

lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
brad

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2007, 01:09:02 AM »

Lanny, You will be able to fine 1200 grit paper at any autobody supply shop, even 2000 use it wet as is plugs very easy and don't push down, let the paper do the work. It's used for final sanding and wet sanding paint before final polish. I think Tamiya also sets sand paper packs with 3 or 4 various grades of very fine sand paper.

brad
Logged

I drempt, I planned, I'm building
lanny

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2007, 03:55:31 PM »

Thanks Brad!

lanny nicolet
Logged

ICRR Steam & "Green Diamond" era modeler
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!