ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 05, 2020, 06:44:07 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  small self tapping screws
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: small self tapping screws  (Read 3488 times)
jerryl

View Profile
« on: May 28, 2009, 12:27:00 PM »

  Before you throw those audio or video cassettes away, take some time to remove the screws that hold most of them together.  Trust me, some day you will need one or more of them.   jerry
Logged
pdlethbridge
Guest
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2009, 01:44:25 PM »

Waste not, want not.  Good idea
Logged
OkieRick

Trackside in Rural OK


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2009, 12:23:40 AM »


When you go to inquire or buy these 'little screws' - all 347 gazillion required to MR - how do you tell the guy at a fastener store, "it's only about this big" as he looks at you thinking "why doesn't he want 10,000 SAE 1 inch machine bolts 6 inches long so I can make some money?"

What sizes are these little buggers, seriously!?


Okie

Logged

Invacare 2-2-2 TDX5 Tilt Recline & Elevate - 24v - ALS Head Control
God Bless Jimmie Rogers the Singing Brakeman
Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2009, 01:19:33 AM »

No, no, it's...waste not, want LOTS.
Logged

I know what I wrote, I don't need a quote
Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2009, 01:19:49 AM »

To tell the size of screws, you need three things - a digital caliper to measure diameter, a thread gauge to measure pitch and a table of thread sizes to figure out what you have.

Metric machine screws are usually a bit smaller than their nominal size, for example an M4 or 4 mm machine screw is typically about 3.8 mm in diameter.  Their pitch is given as the number of mm between adjacent threads.  For example, an M4x0.7 is a metric machine screw nominally 4 mm in diameter with the threads .7 mm apart.

In the imperial system, machine screws are designated by a number related to diameter and a pitch expressed as threads per inch.  Some examples are #2-56, #4-40, #6-32, #8-32 and #10-32.  The diameter in inches is .06 plus .013 times the number.  For example, a #6-32 is .06 + .013 * 6 = .138 inches in diameter.

Some metric machine screws look similar to imperial machine screws.  For example, an M5x0.8 is virtually indistinguishable by the naked eye from an imperial #10-32, but they are not interchangeable.

Self tapping machine screws are generally specified only by diameter in metric or # in imperial measure.  They are similar in size to wood screws but not identical.  In addition, wood screws are tapered, self tapping screws may be straight or slightly tapered at the lead end.

But if you really want to buy screws, then you also need to specify head style, slot type, material and finish.  It really is not a simple subject.

Jim
Logged

Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2009, 01:32:03 AM »

2-56 phillips machine screws for trucks/couplers, low as 59 cents per 100.

http://tinyurl.com/kjmcdu
« Last Edit: May 29, 2009, 01:53:18 AM by Yampa Bob » Logged

I know what I wrote, I don't need a quote
Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
ALCOS4EVER


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2009, 03:17:11 PM »

Try Micro Fasteners - (800) 892-6917
Logged
Jhanecker2

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2009, 05:31:50 PM »

Jim Banner is right, it is not a simple subject. Whenever I need more screws to finish a repair,  I usually "mike " the screw in Imperial and metric units and then look it up in the Machinery Handbook.  Works OK for machine screws , but it does not work for woodscrews
Fastener Manufacturers have their reference Manuals  for many of their products. I usually end up going down the aisles of Ace , Menards , Home Depot , Woodcraft or industrial Supply stores on a quest .  Sometimes I Think the "Grail  Quest " is easier. John II
Logged
mudzuks

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2009, 06:37:18 PM »

I love this thread, I made my wife read it so she understands I am not a nut and why I stop and pick up every discarded boom box, vcr and dvd player and then spend an hour disassembling these things, they have a great amount of tiny nuts bolts screws pulleys belts arms sprockets springs and motors which I use to animate stuff and model.

Jeff
Logged
OkieRick

Trackside in Rural OK


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2009, 11:39:26 PM »


As usual, great info from all 'cept me.  It's bookmarked as . . .


                      HOW TO SCREW - BY THE PROs


Okie

Logged

Invacare 2-2-2 TDX5 Tilt Recline & Elevate - 24v - ALS Head Control
God Bless Jimmie Rogers the Singing Brakeman
ALCOS4EVER


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2009, 08:11:02 AM »

Go to "boltdepot.com". They have charts and tables to identify what you are looking for. All you will need is a set of calipers.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!