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| | |-+  planning a new layout / layout tables
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Author Topic: planning a new layout / layout tables  (Read 20715 times)
billgiannelli

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« on: January 03, 2015, 08:30:48 AM »

I will soon be moving into a larger apartment where I can use the second bedroom for my train layout!
I will be having a lot more room now!!!!
So I am thinking how to best plan my layout, aside form making it larger!
For one thing I want to setup at least 22" curves and some inclines that are much more gradual.
Any suggestions for tables to use? I am not confident making a table myself.
Any general layout suggestions?
thanks
Bill
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jbrock27

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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2015, 08:34:42 AM »

Are you looking to make a table like 4 x 8 (plywood sheet) or ping pong table (5 x 9) or a set up around the walls of the room?
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billgiannelli

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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2015, 08:44:06 AM »

I was envisioning two tables one either side of the room and then a smaller section connecting the two making a "wrap around" setup. if that makes sense? so in sense both table and around the walls.
Thanks
Bill
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electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2015, 08:56:26 AM »

HI;
I have an idea that I saw in an old "Model Railroader", called "The Truckee and Western" (July 1967).  What this is, is set up sort of like a "Murphy bed"; that is, it is hinged on the floor, and flops down for use.  Now this guy, Don Moran, modeled it in TT scale, but pretty much anything HO scale or smaller could be successfully built.  When brought to operating position, it was the wall height plus the take-up area (that would be permanently attached to the floor) which would be hinged to the main layout.  This could be as wide as you would like (within reason) and when you are done operating, folds up against the wall.  The main drawback is that all wiring, track, and places for structures etc.; would have to be "above floor".
Model railroaders are a divisive lot however; and a lot of ideas have been presented, both on this forum, and in the many publications available.  Good luck in your new place.

SGT C.  
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jbrock27

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« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2015, 09:05:18 AM »

Yes, makes perfect sense.  I would suggest using 1/2" plywood for the bases.  I used 2 x 4s for legs on mine, but you could probably use 2 x 3s or even 1 bys.
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billgiannelli

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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2015, 09:16:18 AM »

Hi Jbrock27!
I am not good at all at wood work. So I was hoping to just buy ready made tables.
Would ping pong tables work?
thanks
Bill
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jbrock27

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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2015, 09:47:59 AM »

Yes (see above).
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Morgun 30

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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2015, 12:08:47 PM »

Hi Jbrock27!
I am not good at all at wood work.
Bill

You'd be surprised at how fast you learn when you start building your table.  You can find videos on the web and, if you have a local train shop and club, someone will be willing to help by pointing you to books, looking at their table, or even helping you build one.

How much area are you planning to work with? I'm sure you already know, but if you have a table against a wall, it can be hard to reach into corners. 
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jward


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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2015, 01:28:31 PM »

unsupported or flimsily supported plywood tables ten to sag over time. you need to put a good foundation under your base or you eventually won't have a usable railroad. remember, ping pong tables are designed with the understanding they don't have a lot of weight on them. a train layout, on the other hand, has a lot more weight than you would think. trains, mountains, buildings, etc all add up.

a good sturdy table is not that hard to build. I would suggest that you find one of the atlas track plan books in your local hobby shop. they have illustrated plans for tabletops ranging from simple to complex. the simplest ones for 4x8 would require 7 pieces of 1x4 lumber; 2 8 footers, and 5 cut to 46 1/2".......most lumber yards or diy stores will cut those odd pieces for you. 

legs can be made from 1x4 and 1x3 lumber fastened together in a 90 degree angle, then bolted into the table frame from each side of the angle.

this will make a table sturdy enough to bear your weight, something a ping pong table would never support.
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
jbrock27

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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2015, 01:45:27 PM »

When I asked here on the HO board, way back when, where I can find a 5 x 9 board, I was told a ping pong table.  No one at that time ever mentioned anything about it not being supportive enough for a layout.
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Len

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« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2015, 02:34:24 PM »

If you can find an old Ping-Pong table, with the 3/8" or 1/2" plywood top, it would be okay to use.

The new ones, with the 1/8", or thereabouts, hardboard tops tend to droop and develop waves over time. You could probably use one as a base for 2" pink or blue insulating foam to build a layout on.

Len
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jbrock27

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« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2015, 02:53:39 PM »

I agree using foam board on top would be they way to go, not only to be able to carve some topography and deaden sound, but to bridge across the small gap in the middle of the table.  1" would work as well, no?
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Len

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« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2015, 03:47:21 PM »

1" would work, but doesn't give as much flexibility for river valleys as 2", or even 4", would.

Len
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jbrock27

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« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2015, 06:12:24 PM »

True.  The other option at that point would be to build "upwards" on top of the base using additional foam pieces.
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2015, 06:14:41 PM »

Bill,
This may help you in building the table, it is divided into several episodes.
You could also build the top portion and secure it to a cheap ping pong table.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyenCuseToA

Jerry
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