ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 17, 2019, 11:49:42 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  Philly wreck.
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print
Author Topic: Philly wreck.  (Read 13595 times)
electrical whiz kid

View Profile
« on: May 13, 2015, 08:15:58 AM »

The  Philadelphia wreck is tragic.  When I saw it this AM, the first thing to come to mind was the "Jenkins Curve wreck" in 1955.  In this case, the engineer was alone in the cab, as the fireman was at the rear of the motor (EP-4); The investigation proved the engineer suffered a heart attack, and did not remove his foot from the "dead-man's pedal".  There was a 35MPH speed restriction at the curve, and the train hit it at 70.  Both are extremely tragic.
SGT C.
Logged
ebtnut

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2015, 09:35:26 AM »

It will be days, maybe weeks, before the cause is determined.  Current speculation is excessive speed, but can't yet rule out equipment failure (broken wheel, axle, etc.), a broken rail, or even sabatoge.  I've talked with engineers in the past who worked around Philly, and they cited instances where items such as old washing machines or refrigerators were dumped onto the right-of-way. 
Logged
rogertra


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2015, 11:57:16 AM »

The  Philadelphia wreck is tragic.  When I saw it this AM, the first thing to come to mind was the "Jenkins Curve wreck" in 1955.  In this case, the engineer was alone in the cab, as the fireman was at the rear of the motor (EP-4); The investigation proved the engineer suffered a heart attack, and did not remove his foot from the "dead-man's pedal".  There was a 35MPH speed restriction at the curve, and the train hit it at 70.  Both are extremely tragic.
SGT C.

Shows the internet danger of the foot pedal.  It's not as safe as the dead man's handle.

The foot pedal can easily be over ridden by placing a heavy lunch box of even better, a joint bar on the pedal.  Don't ask how I know.

Cheers

Roger T.

 
Logged

austrian

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2015, 12:29:12 PM »



The foot pedal can easily be over ridden by placing a heavy lunch box of even better, a joint bar on the pedal.  Don't ask how I know.

Cheers

Roger T.

 
[/quote]

How can the foot pedal be over ridden by placing a lunch box on the pedal? Will the loco not not automatically apply the brakes if the pedal is not released after 30s or some hundred yards?

Thomas
Logged
jbrock27

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2015, 12:30:24 PM »

Not that I can't see it around some areas of Philly, but how does a wash machine or refrigerator stand up to a oncoming train Huh?
Logged

Keep Calm and Carry On
ebtnut

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2015, 12:57:05 PM »

The trick with the "dead-man's" pedal is that you keep your foot on it while putting the holding object in place.  Apparently a favorite move on GG-1's was to wedge one of the signal flags in place.  Seems the length of the wooden handle was just the right length to do this.  As for vagrant appliances, it doesn't take much to derail a train, especially at speed, if something gets under the wheels.  Even a length of chain laid across the rails could do it.
Logged
austrian

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2015, 01:55:33 PM »

If you wedge a piece of wood in place than the pedal is pressed down - but if it is pressed down for more then 1000 yards of pressed down longer than 30 seconds the train will brake -  or is this system different from Austria/Germany?
In Austria you have to release the pedal for a moment after 30s, failing to do so an audible warning reminds you. Failing to aknowledge the warning will apply the brakes and bring the train to stop.

Thomas
Logged
Bucksco

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2015, 02:18:33 PM »

Not sure how long this thread is going to last....
Nobody knows exactly what happened so it is best to avoid conjecture, eh?
This happened only a few blocks from the Bachmann offices and our prayers and condolences go out to all those affected by this tragedy.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 11:16:12 PM by the Bach-man » Logged
Desertdweller

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2015, 02:52:39 PM »

I think a discussion of how to defeat a loco safety system is inappropriate.  In American practice the use of deadman pedals is outmoded.  One problem was that they had to be depressed continuously.

Another dead passenger has been found.  This is indeed a tragic event.  I have lost friends in accidents of this type.  About the best outcome is to find out what actually happened so repeats can be avoided.  For the victims, it is too late already.

My sympathies go out to those involved, and to the Bachmann staff for having their neighborhood impacted by this event.

Les
Logged
richardl
Guest
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2015, 04:17:58 PM »

Latest news report says the train was moving at 107 MPH.

http://news.yahoo.com/amtrak-train-derails-killing-5-people-investigation-begins-073410531--finance.html

Rich
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 04:31:14 PM by richardl » Logged
Jerrys HO
Guest
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2015, 09:44:58 PM »

Sad to hear this and the tragedy it has brought to Philly.
Just North of New Orleans there was another Amtrak mishap caused apparently by another stupid person probably trying to beat the train.
 http://www.nola.com/traffic/index.ssf/2015/05/1_dead_as_new_orleans-bound_am.html
Logged
rogertra


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2015, 10:44:31 PM »


The trick with the "dead-man's" pedal is that you keep your foot on it while putting the holding object in place.  Apparently a favorite move on GG-1's was to wedge one of the signal flags in place.  Seems the length of the wooden handle was just the right length to do this.


Seen that one done as well.  It's even 'better' than the joint bar as with a signal flag, you do not have to explain why it's in the cab like you had to with a joint bar.  :-)


Cheers

Roger T.

Logged

Joe323

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2015, 11:14:22 PM »

Obviously this crowd never saw The Taking of Pelham 123
Logged
Joe323

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2015, 11:16:00 PM »

but it is too early to speculate on this tragedy.
Logged
NarrowMinded


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2015, 01:18:34 AM »

With so much technology in the world today it's rediculous that they don't have automatic systems that would slow the train to max speed limits based on the trains GPS position.

They are testing driverless cars in this country for goodness sake...

Sad that profits keep safety in the dark ages.

Nm-Jeff
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!