ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 31, 2020, 03:38:44 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Please read the Forum Code of Conduct   >>Click Here <<
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  Large
| | |-+  Big Hauler Weights
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Big Hauler Weights  (Read 568 times)
DoyleS

View Profile
« on: December 14, 2019, 03:50:32 PM »

I am retrofitting 3 new Annie Chassis on 3 older Big Haulers.
In reading the instructions from Loco Bill there was no mention of the large weights that sit over the motor gear assy inside the old engines. 
It looks like these can be moved to the new chassis but unsure if this is recommended. 
Logged
DoyleS

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2019, 08:07:02 PM »

Looks like the old weights come off easily and fit the new Annie Chassis.
Doing a search on weights,  I was able to find enough info to indicate it would be a good idea to install the weights to improve pulling power.
Logged
Joe Zullo

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2019, 10:00:31 PM »

I'm sure Loco Bill would say  "you are on the right track!"  Wink
Logged
Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2019, 02:17:02 PM »

Joe You got it!! 

The weights should install  ok and yes traction will be greatly improved.

Loco Bill
Logged

Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
Dr Who 12

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2019, 10:34:17 PM »

I have made my own weights similar to the bar weights in the gen.5 Annie 4-6-0 locos.
 I bought bar stock in the right width from a local hone improvement or hardware store and cut to length like the orig. cast weight. As I recall it took 7 -1/8 " thick lengths of bar stock glue them together with epoxy and drill the mounting holes. Make the bar weight the same design as the orig. cast ones.

  Later DrWho
Logged
Stokerman

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2020, 02:51:23 PM »

I've replaced the original cast iron weight with two 7.2 volt 6800mAh six cell battery packs hooked in series for 14.4 volts, surrounded by some sheet lead until it just fits, so a slight increase in weight and slightly better tractive effort, using Radio Control off of the same battery packs.

A wonderful way to go in my experience!
Logged
Fred2179

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2020, 10:30:16 AM »

I've replaced the original cast iron weight with two 7.2 volt 6800mAh six cell battery packs hooked in series for 14.4 volts, surrounded by some sheet lead until it just fits, so a slight increase in weight and slightly better tractive effort, using Radio Control off of the same battery packs.

A wonderful way to go in my experience!
Me too. I had a long argument with certain learned experts about using batteries in the loco as weights rather than putting them in the tender.  Seems obvious to me that hauling around the weight and the batteries was silly.
Logged
Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2020, 04:50:28 PM »

Hi All,

Batteries in place of weights is a good way to add weight, but it does have some disadvantages depending on your point of view.  In my own case I put the batteries in the tender for the simple reason that if they run down I can simply replace the dead battery pack with a fresh one.  doing it the tender has not hurt my pulling power by much, and I can also simply add a second locomotive just like the prototype would if the train was too heavy.  In the event I have a battery go bad, it is a simple matter again of just exchanging the pack without having to dissemble  the locomotive just to get to the batteries.  I have all my locomotives with dummy front couplers replaced with with an operating front coupler just so I can double head.

 I post this with the thought that each of us has their own way of doing things and none of them are "wrong", just the persons preference.

Loco Bill
Logged

Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
Joe Zullo

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2020, 05:59:15 PM »

I am of your persuasion Bill.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 06:06:37 PM by Joe Zullo » Logged
Greg Elmassian


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2020, 01:27:54 AM »

Lithium batteries are not as heavy as the old nicad ones.

I like the idea of the batteries and some lead coming up with about the same weight.

On the other hand, if you pull a lot of cars, you will quickly learn what happens if your tender is too light, pulls right off the track.

If you can have good bearings in the tender, I'd put the batteries in there, just for convenience of access...

Greg
Logged

Visit my site: lots of tips and techniques: http://www.elmassian.com
Joe Zullo

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2020, 10:01:09 AM »

Greg is 100% correct about too light a tender. I know first hand. Roll Eyes
Logged
Stokerman

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2020, 03:46:10 PM »

Separating the chassis from the boiler shell on the Big Haulers is not all that much of a problem, so battery packs mounted in there are still reasonably accessible. Been battery powered for a few years now without any cells failing, so at that frequency I still think the boiler shell is a good way to house the battery packs in the Big Haulers.

I have removed the chassis from the shell a few times over those year, just to experiment with shimming the gears to get more gear tooth mesh, as it seems Bachmann designed the gear train backwards, such that the worm is pushing the worm gear out of the way (sideways) when going forward under load making it so that the axle gear is only about 1/3rd in mesh. In reverse it pulls the gears into 100% mesh, which is nice, but should have been designed the other way around, or built with less lateral slop. Teflon split washer shims to block that lateral movement seem to help a whole lot. But I digress, and perhaps should do a separate thread covering all that.

There is a huge caveat to mounting the battery packs in the boiler shell however, and that is that several of the engines do not have boilers nearly as large as does the Big Hauler. So of necessity, the smaller boilered engines, like the 4-4-0 & 2-6-0 need to have the battery packs mounted in the tender just as Bill and other's have said. Certainly there is nothing wrong with this, even on the Big Haulers, and other larger engines as well, and just as they have said, it does make access somewhat easier! 

Have yet to lift any wheels on my tender pulling uphill around corners, but then I rarely pull more than ten cars, so maybe I haven't hit that wall yet. If I ever do, I'm sure the addition of some extra weight there will make the cure, but then we're back to why not just put the batteries in there to start with ... perhaps I'll just do that next time myself!?!?
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!