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Author Topic: telephone polls  (Read 6487 times)
mf5117
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« on: May 19, 2009, 09:38:15 AM »

I have looked threw alot of Model Railroad Magazines . And have counted about 30 different scale Layouts , that have made it , to get an article wrote about them . I counted only 11 , that only had the lines strung on the Telephone Polls . To Me , this isn't a completed layout and shouldn't be given the glory of making to a magazines . I know it is a tough task to do this . But isn't that a part of Modeling . Or is that something we can over look in this hobby and is acceptable ....
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Woody Elmore

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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2009, 10:01:45 AM »

Telephone poles have been written about often - but maybe not recently. The problem is the material used for the wires. Depending on scale even the finest wire or string looks terribly oversized. Plus you really need a lot more poles than most people.

They can be an interesting addition to any layout. To properly do them with insulators and all the other devices found on them takes a lot of research and the time spent to duplicate them may be better spent on something else.

I'm sure other users of this board will be able to give you detailed inforamtion.

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CNE Runner


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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2009, 10:36:47 AM »

The subject of correctly modeling telephone poles (not polls...which are something else entirely), has come up from time to time in the hobby. The basic consensus is that a scene seems to be missing "something" if telephone/telegraph poles are not strung. Without getting into all the nuances, there are a couple of choices for the modeler: one of the manufacturers makes poles that are already strung (sorry, I don't remember which one...perhaps someone in the forum can help me out there), or you can get very fine, stretchable line (in various colors) from Berkshire Junction. Their product is called EZ Line and comes in various thicknesses as well as colors. Their website is http://www.berkshirejunction.com/ and their service is wonderful. I was going to use this product as reins for my various horses and wagons (I model in the later 1800s). Unfortunately the product has too much "curl" to be of use in that regard.

Regards,
Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2009, 11:15:09 AM »

I am of the school of thought that says if you put up the poles correctly, the mind will supply the wires.

No physical wires means nothing to catch a sleeve button on and nothing to pull down a whole layout's worth of poles and wires in one fell swoop.

I have been waiting for thirty years for someone to comment on my lack of wires.  I have an answer ready - "the spiders I hired as linemen are out on strike" - but sadly, have never had the chance to use it.
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 11:23:21 AM »

I am of the school of thought that says if you put up the poles correctly, the mind will supply the wires.

Sage words. My school of thought, too.
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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 11:24:39 AM »

Telephone poles have been written about often - but maybe not recently. The problem is the material used for the wires. Depending on scale even the finest wire or string looks terribly oversized. Plus you really need a lot more poles than most people.

You could try substituting some Lithuanians. ...

Ba-da-bing!
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mf5117
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« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 12:29:09 PM »

Sorry my fingers get to going before my brain does . My gf was doing more scenery , and the question was brought to my attention . As she was wanting to string the "Poles" . And what was the best way to go about it  . She and I were wondering why some are and some aren't strung .Thanks for the links and the post .

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Atlantic Central

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« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2009, 01:20:41 PM »

Being a retired electrical designer who often designed pole line systems, I know more than the average person about what would be "right" or "wrong". I have seen very effective modeling done both ways, with actual strung poles and "imaginary" lines. The trick is understanding where and how they should be positioned, with or without wires actually strung.

The fact is we seldom notice the wires themselves in real life, it is the poles we have encounters with, on sidewalks, while cutting lawns, driving down narrow rural lanes, etc. So Jim is right, the wires, while they may add that extra level of detail, don't need to be there for the effect to work.

And, as one more point of correctness, they are only "telephone" poles if they carry excusively telephone wires. The correct general term is "utility pole" as they generally carry power, phone and cable TV wiring these days, all on the same poles in many cases.

Sheldon
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bevernie

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« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2009, 01:41:51 PM »

 ;DGREETINGS!! Ray, I looked at the Berkshire site, and the cost, and it left me wondering why simple sewing thread, at a fraction of the cost, could not be used!! Huh? It comes in various sizes, some comes unbreakable, various colors, and looks very realistic!! Shocked
      Wink It can also resemble chains to secure a load on a flatbed!! Roll Eyes
                                                                                           THANX!!
                                                         Cool                                 Ernie
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NelsOn-30

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« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2009, 03:02:11 PM »

The model poles that are available are representative of telegraph poles. These have cross arms and insulators to tie down open (non insulated) copper wire.

The telegraph was a necessity for the railways communication and the excess capacity provided a lucrative side business.

These pole lines followed the right of ways.

With the upgrade to radio the telegraph lines were abandoned.

The value of the copper as scrap has caused the removal of the wire leaving the prototype for wireless pole lines.

This is an example of rule # 1-A (Anything can be justified).
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Nelson

Notka Lake Logging & Navigation RR
rustyrails
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« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2009, 03:45:27 PM »

I've rigged a lot of ship models over the years, so the concept of "rigging" utility poles would not be foreign to me, but the problem I've always had is that utility lines are not stretched tight.  The trace of the wire between poles is (I guess) a section of a parabola. I have no idea how to model that, although, I suspect that soaking thread in diluted white glue before attaching it to the poles might  produce the desired effect.  When I get started on scenery, I'll try that and report.

Rusty
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ebtnut

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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2009, 04:27:09 PM »

Sewing thread has a number of issues.  First, it tends to both fray over time and gather dust, leaving your "wires" looking a bit fuzzy.  Two, it doesn't sag properly (neither does the flexible stuff).  Three, and most important, it doesn't give when you stick your hand or arm into the scene to re-rail something, or do some scenery up-grades, or whatever. 

The Bershire Jct. material, being some form of rubber, has the advantage of not breaking or pulling down your poles if you bump them.  However, it doesn't have the "sag" either, and it is oversize for what it represents.  Consider this - railroad wires, as noted, were originally for telegraphs, and were uninsulated copper wires of about 10 gauge.  That's about 1/8 inch in diameter, which scales out to about .001 inch for HO scale.  That' why a lot of folks just don't bother with trying to string the wires - They really are close to being spider webbing!
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James in FL

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« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2009, 10:28:21 PM »

The level of detail one wishes to have on one’s layout is a personal choice dependent on many factors some of which may be time, cost, and risk/reward.

Quote
I counted only 11 , that only had the lines strung on the Telephone Polls . To Me , this isn't a completed layout and shouldn't be given the glory of making to a magazines .

If you look for the good in something, you will see the good.
If you look for the bad, you will see the bad.

When you publish your own magazine, featuring the railroad hobby, then you can decide who get’s the “glory”.
 
BTW your rolling stock is made mainly from plastic and your locos run off 12v DC fed from the tracks, now how realistic is that?
 
From your post, I see you are one of “those” who feel they know the proper way to model.

You may be surprised to find in life; very few give rats behind about your opinion, particularly about another’s personal choices.

You are an ambassador for the hobby, and you wear it well. 


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grumpy

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« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2009, 12:34:31 AM »

If anyone is really interested in stringing wire on their poles use fishing line. You can have a selection of thickness and colour. It stretches just enough to put the right sag in it from pole to pole.
Don
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RAM

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« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2009, 12:37:51 AM »

I could be wrong but those wires always looked like steel and not copper.
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